Bonobos.HomePage History

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May 06, 2018, at 09:51 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
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Dr. Gay Reinartz’ Boy Friday and Pope Francis’ Favorite Ask of Georgetown U. China Scholars

Dear Judith and James,

Wow! You two are on the spot. I hope you don’t judge me importunate for barging into your mind with tales of how important Dr. Gay’s work is and how and why I judge myself, with you and yours, equipped with resources to make a bit of history pulling together intellectuals and activists across the world to

Save the Bonobos!

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=mnb1.jpg

“Madame Gay” is methinks a painfully shy Jean d’Arc of the species we now call Bonobo. During my Luke Skywalker and Obi Wan periods, my life was a series, often interrelated, of common good obsessions. The bonobos’ survival for the common good!

In my apprentice Yoda phase, my job is simply to connect complimentary young(anyone under 50) Olympian menschen with peers and worthy elders. “The organizational form of the 21st century is the network!” And cultural evolution involves “distributed cognitive networks” or “mind sharing” for common causes.

So…I am here in hopes of inspiring a tiny fraction of “woke ecopreneurs” from the Chinese/Vatican/Belgian/Japanese
communities to give some attention to the survival of the bonobos, building upon Gay’s work since 1993 in the Congo Solanga Forest, where she has been researching the bonobos’ presence, while also groping along in efforts to develop a coherent “park guard” force.

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=ragtagguards.jpg

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=cybershotsflash.gif

And…

Gay and her team will be working with AWF to survey a corridor of this landscape for bonobo presence and distribution. The process will involve training local Congolese in bio-monitoring and data collection – this training will also serve as a capacity building tool so that the local Congolese can continue this work after the ZSM has finished in this area.

Here’s one of Gay’s reports from Spring 2008 that inspires and informs, as do four others from the same period which still greatly inform.

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage#toc6

Why Should We Care About Saving The Species Called Bonobo?

Bonobos are the real deal. They share more than 98% of our DNA. They are so much like us that some of us actually cry when we meet them for the first time. I think it’s a powerful primal response to their “like us-ness,” or a tangible reminder that “we are not alone.”

Bonobos look like chimps but they stand-up straighter. Whereas chimps are mesomorphic like a football running back, for example, bonobos are ectomorphic like a long-distance runner or wide receiver. In the wild they spend a great deal of time hanging out in the jungle canopy, eighty-feet above the ground/swamp/most of us.

The nature of bonobo society speaks directly to the question of “why should I care (about bonobos).” They have a complex society that is maternal centric. The alpha female is the dominant personality in the family/clan. She gets to be the alpha female based upon her skill at and propensity to groom others. Imagine a society in which leadership is bestowed as a result of one’s record of service to others.

Another part of it is they resolve disputes by using affection and sex. Admittedly this is a very simplistic explanation of a social order replete with complexity and nuance, but it is at the heart of why we need to save the bonobos from extinction. Loss of the bonobos in the wild would be tragic in that they represent a portal into understanding ourselves.

Bonobos are endangered in the wild primarily because of habitat loss and poaching, victims of ignorance and third world poverty. If we lose the world’s wild poplulations, we will no longer be able to study them in their natural environment. They are only found in the Democratic Republic of Congo in Central Africa, in one relatively small location in a very troubled part of the world.

Godsil’s Ask

So I am hoping you might introduce the concept of a Chinese/Vatican/Belgian/Japanese/American collaboration experiment over the next 10 years to support Gay’s work, even if the results are only a documentary shared by tiny fractions in each country(and the Vatican’s network).

I am so astonished at how often I have wound up on the stage of history because of simple notes like this..
I have deep ties with the Jesuits across the world and can’t help but imagine a Laudato Si Celebration in Vatican Square with one giant screen sharing the story of, and our story with, the glorious bonobos!

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=bb1.jpg | http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=bb2.jpg http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=bb3.jpg

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage?action=download&upname=bonobof.jpg

Godsil As A Jesuit Trained Forest Gump

I am the circles image at Marquette Park, Chicago Open Housing Marches, in which I was a nanosecond bodyguard for Dr. King and teacher in a Freedom School.

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/—EXiKngnxpM/Wni9rTR4vnI/AAAAAAAANcM/fkqxeuAnK8kRkIYE0GLwgljtw-MjqN9mgCLcBGAs/s1600/Bodyguard%2Bfor%2BDr.%2BMartin%2BLuther%2BKing%252C%2BChicago%2BOpen%2BHousing%2BMarches%2B1966.png

My entrance on the stage of history has inspired me to imagine myself not justg as an Apprentice Yoda, but also as a Jesuit Trained Forest Gump. The Jesuits, for example, gave me $8,000 in 1966 for the St. Louis U. Great Issues Series, which had a huge impact on bringing the talented 10% of the Catholics of St. Louis into the modern age.

I introduced the South Side Chicago Sweet Water Foundation team to whom Naomi Klein identified as a key draft writer and Pope Francis’ ecological advisor.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dgb45nXOSfA/WoIFbVsM_FI/AAAAAAAANnM/BquEEtSLDpkXUlKb98q6rIaXvDiYsxPAQCLcBGAs/s1600/%25282%2529%2BFr.%2BSean%2BWith%2BSWF%2BTeam%2BAt%2BPratt%2BIrish%2BMuseum%2Bof%2BModern%2BArt%2BWorkshop.png | Sweet Water Team At Irish Museum of Modern Art w. Fr. Sean McDonagh

The State Department sent me to India to share the Growing Power and Sweet Water Urban Ag and Aquaponics stories.

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TiMfMWK1I6s/WrPudf-ixnI/AAAAAAAAOCQ/MfuPBWwVmVkh_qOPyWml2y4JQFXuSp8AACLcBGAs/s1600/zcc.png

With Jimmy Carter during Habitat building project…

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-jvdNvKcUIOI/Wni8ozn6lWI/AAAAAAAANaw/Y2qAsLJeUIMNBjjkgwZYH54cxLX94d6RwCLcBGAs/s1600/%25285%2529%2B%2B%2BJimmy%2B%2526%2BRoselynn%2BCarter%2BEnjoy%2BAppropriate%2BTechnology.png

I could go on and on with the miracles of my life related to notes like this.

I hope this is the first of many with you and yours to

Save the Bonobos!

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January 27, 2013, at 02:21 PM by Godsil -
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Dr. Gay Reinartz Podcast Link 2013

http://milwaukeerotary.libsyn.com/webpage/dr-gay-reinartz-protecting-bonobos-and-elephants-in-the-democratic-republic-of-congo

June 02, 2010, at 09:08 AM by Godsil -
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The Last Great Ape

Tuesday, December 22 at 8 pm ET/PT on NOVA

to:

The Last Great Ape

Tuesday, December 22 at 8 pm ET/PT on NOVA

June 02, 2010, at 09:08 AM by Godsil -
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The Last Great Ape

Tuesday, December 22 at 8 pm ET/PT on NOVA

to:

The Last Great Ape

Tuesday, December 22 at 8 pm ET/PT on NOVA

December 22, 2009, at 10:25 AM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
Changed lines 2-14 from:
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The Last Great Ape

Tuesday, December 22 at 8 pm ET/PT on NOVA

Check your local listings as dates and times may vary.

With their intelligent gaze, human-like posture, and peaceful nature, it’s no wonder bonobos—one of five great apes, along with gorillas, chimpanzees, orangutans, and humans—remind us of ourselves. But while we share a common hominoid ancestor with bonobos as well as 98 percent of our DNA, this unique primate has been largely overlooked by all but a few scientists. Learn more on NOVA’s “The Last Great Ape.”

See a slide show of bonobo gestures and facial expressions and find out what they mean, see where you stand among the great apes in an audiovisual interactive, and more on the program’s companion website.

Watch the program online beginning December 23.
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November 15, 2009, at 12:46 PM by Tyler Schuster - several additions
Added lines 3-22:

Etate Burning.jpg – this is an old picture from when Etate was a poacher’s camp. We burned the old Etate to the ground and re-built it as a research station.

Rebuild Etate 3 M6.jpg – this is a slightly newer picture of building Etate as our new research station.

This is our most recent shot of Etate from the river (similar to the shot of ‘burning etate’). This is how it looks now with many guard barracks, kitchen, and gathering places.

Another recent shot of Etate from on the grounds (similar to the old ‘rebuilding’ picture).

An old picture of how the original guards looked before their training.

Picture of Gay with the current Etate guards.

More to come!

October 02, 2009, at 08:15 AM by Commonwealth Citizen -
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A Nobel Prize for the Good Food ®Evolution!

Bill Clinton’s declaration of Growing Power’s Will Allen as “my hero,”
And commitment of $2,000,000 for Big Will’s contextually appropriate,
cost efficient, high yield, sustainable, local food system models
for South Africa and Zimbabwe

and

The Milwaukee Zoological Society’s Congo Bio Diversity project’s
possibly linking their work with the aquaculture initiatives
of the new Wisconsin School of Fresh Water Sciences and
Growing Power

suggests our movement may not be far from a Nobel Prize for
our work, properly accorded to Will Allen, whose Growing Power team
and its widening web of partners throughout the world are firmly establishing
the linkage of food security and world security, as Will is constantly reminding us.

Bill Clinton
Will Allen
Food Security
Bio-diversity

Benign globalization!

As Grace Lee Boggs expresses it…

®Evolution!

Or Big Will’s “good food revolution!”

A richly deserved Nobel Prize for our Big Guy,
Whose collaborative methodologies translate into…

a Nobel Prize for

The good food workers of the world.

July 26, 2009, at 10:39 PM by Commonwealth Citizen -
Added lines 3-25:

Bonobo survival. Human redemption.

Redemption

Bonobo survival.
Human redemption.

I am a Board Member of Growing Power, which has a good chance, in Will Allen’s words, of making Milwaukee “The Urban Agriculture City of America.”

Fred Binkowski of the Great Lakes Water Institute properly states that Milwaukee has the resources to become the Urban Aquaculture City of America.

In my mind, the work of Dr. Gay, Dr. Davis, and the Milwaukee Zoological Society,
in their Bonobo Survival and Congo Biodiversity Progorams, are laying the foundation for Milwaukee to become the “Bonobo Survival City of America.”

Bonobo survival,
Human redemption.

I can see the day when our Milwaukee children go forth to the entire world and make history preserving our sacred species from destruction.

Bonobo survival,
Human redemption.

May 09, 2009, at 12:29 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
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Dr. Gay Reinartz Report From the Congo Spring 2009

to:

ZSM team arrival in Basankusu

Added lines 6-33:

Dear Friends, Family and Supporters,

Gay, Nathaniel and Patrick arrived safely in Basankusu yesterday after a 30 hr pirogue ride. They arrived safely, but a bit sunburnt!

This trip is different from our previous trips to DRC in that we are collaborating with the African Wildlife Foundation to survey an area of the landscape in which AWF does their conservation work – the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba landscape. Gay and her team will be working with AWF to survey a corridor of this landscape for bonobo presence and distribution. The process will involve training local Congolese in bio-monitoring and data collection – this training will also serve as a capacity building tool so that the local Congolese can continue this work after the ZSM has finished in this area.

For your reference, I have attached a map which details where ZSM normally conducts their research and conservation work in the Salonga National Park (shown in yellow), the new landscape where the team is heading this trip — the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba landscape (shown in green) and the corridor within that landscape where we will be conducting research during this mission (shown in pink).

The trip thus far has involved flying from Kinshasa to Mbandaka (both the ZSM team and our cargo). From Mbandaka, the team and cargo loaded the pirogues and travelled by river to Basankusu. From Basankusu, the team and cargo will again travel by river to the pink colored study site.

We will keep you updated on the team’s whereabouts as information becomes available. In the meantime, do not hesitate to contact the ZSM offices (by email or phone) if you have any questions or concerns.

Thanks and best wishes,
Stefanie

Stefanie McLaughlin
Assistant Conservation Coordinator
Zoological Society of Milwaukee
1421 N. Water Street
Milwaukee, WI 53202
(414) 276–0339 ext. 302
(414) 276–0886 - fax
SKYPE: stefanie.mclaughlin
stefaniem@zoosociety.org
Back to top

Dr. Gay Reinartz Report From the Congo Spring 2009

May 09, 2009, at 12:26 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
Changed lines 4-72 from:

We have just come back from an 8 day tour, and the field work is finally
over!! We are wiped. My feet and knees may never recover from the
swamps and the roots and the twisted trails. This has been the most
difficult tour of our stay here due to its length, the consistent rains,
the weight of food, and the distances we had to walk just to get to the
sampling area! We were three teams, each covering approximately 90 km
of few trails and bushwhacking.

For this trip, each team (8 persons) had to be ferried to the forest by
pirogues in order to reach the main trail head since the water is now
rising — we have had rain every day. The teams separated at the trail
head and went different directions in order to sample the broadest
possible area. Nat went west (then northwest), Pat east, and I, south.
It was worrisome to say good-bye since we knew this trip would test our
strength and endurance to the extreme. For our team, we walked 2 days
to reach the southern most river, the Longkomo, and we sampled long
transects that cover the main ridge. Patrick and Nathaniel went to what
is called the ‘Big Forest’ — a new area in the eastern most portion of
the study area, which we hoped would have the mother load of bonobos. My
team found around 50 nests in all, but Nathaniel and Patrick
unfortunately found huge hunting pressures, many snares, essentially no
bonobos in that section.

On the 8th day, each team was to head back toward the trail head. I
don’t think I have ever crossed so many swamps in all my days in Congo -
mud and water hip high. My team was wonderful, and I had abundant help
over fallen logs and river crossings — even when I didn’t need any!
Bipole, the hunter, who is our main guide and my self-appointed
protector, would nearly break my hand each time he escorted me over
fallen trees, gripping it so hard to make sure that Madame does not
fall. I felt like a chicken caught and carried by the wing. On the 8th
day, we had to struggle to meet our pick-up goal because we got caught
in some very thick understory of secondary forest - nasty stuff thick
with thorns and vines. Eventually at 3:00 p.m., we reached the trail
head where we found out from the locals that Patrick’s group had already
come out that morning and that Nathaniel’s group had reached the point
one hour before our arrival, all well and safe, no major incidences. We
gratefully clambered aboard the waiting pirogue and a great cheer went
up from the men — back to dry beds, food, and a well deserved rest.

In this base camp, we have an unexpected treat, a wonderful local
guitarist who bellows out folk songs and plays a homemade guitar. So,
last night to celebrate our return, we bought some local whiskey, jazzed
up Mr. Iruz, and threw ourselves a grand dancing party !! Drums made
from water jugs and guitar: it doesn’t get much better than this.

We’re resting up today, going over the data sheets and downloading the
GPS points. It appears that the bonobo here is strictly confined to a
strip nearly equidistant between the populated areas along the major
rivers. This is also where we find the loveliest forest…, so it will
be hard to test our hypothesis that bonobos prefer the mixed mature
forests with the Marantaceae understory. We’ll see how the numbers
shake out. We look forward to the analysis.

Within the next 3 days, we will try to wrap up things with the students.
After 2 months of work and living so close together, it will be an
emotional departure for each of us. The men are already asking whether
we will see each other again and discussing how we can stay in touch by
phonie/radio. I can’t bear to think about it yet. We plan to head back
to Basankusu beginning the 11th. Because we only have the small pirogue
this far upriver, we will have to make several trips back and forth on
the Lomako in order to move our equipment, the rest of the fuel and
ourselves back down to Bombese, our original base camp. I can’t believe
we are on the “homestretch.” (I tried to teach the guys one night what
“homestretch” means; another one of my failed attempts to close the
cultural gap! They were too polite to say, Madame, we have NO idea what
you are talking about.)

to:

We have just come back from an 8 day tour, and the field work is finally over!! We are wiped. My feet and knees may never recover from the swamps and the roots and the twisted trails. This has been the most difficult tour of our stay here due to its length, the consistent rains, the weight of food, and the distances we had to walk just to get to the sampling area! We were three teams, each covering approximately 90 km of few trails and bushwhacking.

For this trip, each team (8 persons) had to be ferried to the forest by pirogues in order to reach the main trail head since the water is now rising — we have had rain every day. The teams separated at the trail head and went different directions in order to sample the broadest possible area. Nat went west (then northwest), Pat east, and I, south. It was worrisome to say good-bye since we knew this trip would test our strength and endurance to the extreme. For our team, we walked 2 days to reach the southern most river, the Longkomo, and we sampled long transects that cover the main ridge. Patrick and Nathaniel went to what is called the ‘Big Forest’ — a new area in the eastern most portion of the study area, which we hoped would have the mother load of bonobos. My team found around 50 nests in all, but Nathaniel and Patrick unfortunately found huge hunting pressures, many snares, essentially no bonobos in that section.

On the 8th day, each team was to head back toward the trail head. I don’t think I have ever crossed so many swamps in all my days in Congo - mud and water hip high. My team was wonderful, and I had abundant help over fallen logs and river crossings — even when I didn’t need any! Bipole, the hunter, who is our main guide and my self-appointed protector, would nearly break my hand each time he escorted me over fallen trees, gripping it so hard to make sure that Madame does not fall. I felt like a chicken caught and carried by the wing. On the 8th day, we had to struggle to meet our pick-up goal because we got caught in some very thick understory of secondary forest - nasty stuff thick with thorns and vines. Eventually at 3:00 p.m., we reached the trail head where we found out from the locals that Patrick’s group had already come out that morning and that Nathaniel’s group had reached the point one hour before our arrival, all well and safe, no major incidences. We gratefully clambered aboard the waiting pirogue and a great cheer went up from the men — back to dry beds, food, and a well deserved rest.

In this base camp, we have an unexpected treat, a wonderful local guitarist who bellows out folk songs and plays a homemade guitar. So, last night to celebrate our return, we bought some local whiskey, jazzed up Mr. Iruz, and threw ourselves a grand dancing party !! Drums made from water jugs and guitar: it doesn’t get much better than this.

We’re resting up today, going over the data sheets and downloading the GPS points. It appears that the bonobo here is strictly confined to a strip nearly equidistant between the populated areas along the major rivers. This is also where we find the loveliest forest…, so it will be hard to test our hypothesis that bonobos prefer the mixed mature forests with the Marantaceae understory. We’ll see how the numbers shake out. We look forward to the analysis.

Within the next 3 days, we will try to wrap up things with the students. After 2 months of work and living so close together, it will be an emotional departure for each of us. The men are already asking whether we will see each other again and discussing how we can stay in touch by phonie/radio. I can’t bear to think about it yet. We plan to head back to Basankusu beginning the 11th. Because we only have the small pirogue this far upriver, we will have to make several trips back and forth on the Lomako in order to move our equipment, the rest of the fuel and ourselves back down to Bombese, our original base camp. I can’t believe we are on the “homestretch.” (I tried to teach the guys one night what “homestretch” means; another one of my failed attempts to close the cultural gap! They were too polite to say, Madame, we have NO idea what you are talking about.)

Changed lines 19-20 from:
to:
May 09, 2009, at 07:13 AM by Godsil -
Added lines 3-74:

Dr. Gay Reinartz Report From the Congo Spring 2009

We have just come back from an 8 day tour, and the field work is finally
over!! We are wiped. My feet and knees may never recover from the
swamps and the roots and the twisted trails. This has been the most
difficult tour of our stay here due to its length, the consistent rains,
the weight of food, and the distances we had to walk just to get to the
sampling area! We were three teams, each covering approximately 90 km
of few trails and bushwhacking.

For this trip, each team (8 persons) had to be ferried to the forest by
pirogues in order to reach the main trail head since the water is now
rising — we have had rain every day. The teams separated at the trail
head and went different directions in order to sample the broadest
possible area. Nat went west (then northwest), Pat east, and I, south.
It was worrisome to say good-bye since we knew this trip would test our
strength and endurance to the extreme. For our team, we walked 2 days
to reach the southern most river, the Longkomo, and we sampled long
transects that cover the main ridge. Patrick and Nathaniel went to what
is called the ‘Big Forest’ — a new area in the eastern most portion of
the study area, which we hoped would have the mother load of bonobos. My
team found around 50 nests in all, but Nathaniel and Patrick
unfortunately found huge hunting pressures, many snares, essentially no
bonobos in that section.

On the 8th day, each team was to head back toward the trail head. I
don’t think I have ever crossed so many swamps in all my days in Congo -
mud and water hip high. My team was wonderful, and I had abundant help
over fallen logs and river crossings — even when I didn’t need any!
Bipole, the hunter, who is our main guide and my self-appointed
protector, would nearly break my hand each time he escorted me over
fallen trees, gripping it so hard to make sure that Madame does not
fall. I felt like a chicken caught and carried by the wing. On the 8th
day, we had to struggle to meet our pick-up goal because we got caught
in some very thick understory of secondary forest - nasty stuff thick
with thorns and vines. Eventually at 3:00 p.m., we reached the trail
head where we found out from the locals that Patrick’s group had already
come out that morning and that Nathaniel’s group had reached the point
one hour before our arrival, all well and safe, no major incidences. We
gratefully clambered aboard the waiting pirogue and a great cheer went
up from the men — back to dry beds, food, and a well deserved rest.

In this base camp, we have an unexpected treat, a wonderful local
guitarist who bellows out folk songs and plays a homemade guitar. So,
last night to celebrate our return, we bought some local whiskey, jazzed
up Mr. Iruz, and threw ourselves a grand dancing party !! Drums made
from water jugs and guitar: it doesn’t get much better than this.

We’re resting up today, going over the data sheets and downloading the
GPS points. It appears that the bonobo here is strictly confined to a
strip nearly equidistant between the populated areas along the major
rivers. This is also where we find the loveliest forest…, so it will
be hard to test our hypothesis that bonobos prefer the mixed mature
forests with the Marantaceae understory. We’ll see how the numbers
shake out. We look forward to the analysis.

Within the next 3 days, we will try to wrap up things with the students.
After 2 months of work and living so close together, it will be an
emotional departure for each of us. The men are already asking whether
we will see each other again and discussing how we can stay in touch by
phonie/radio. I can’t bear to think about it yet. We plan to head back
to Basankusu beginning the 11th. Because we only have the small pirogue
this far upriver, we will have to make several trips back and forth on
the Lomako in order to move our equipment, the rest of the fuel and
ourselves back down to Bombese, our original base camp. I can’t believe
we are on the “homestretch.” (I tried to teach the guys one night what
“homestretch” means; another one of my failed attempts to close the
cultural gap! They were too polite to say, Madame, we have NO idea what
you are talking about.)

Much love, Gay

February 14, 2009, at 11:28 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
Added lines 27-28:

I pray humanity learns to grow and eat more fish,
So we bonobos are not a protein temptation.

February 11, 2009, at 11:26 AM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
Added lines 5-15:

Londa Bonobo was captured in present day DRC in 1958 at an estimated age of two years. Her first captive home was at the Antwerp Zoo until she went to the San Diego Zoo in 1962. At San Diego, she and her mate, Kakowet (approximately 4 years her junior) produced nearly a dozen infants. Kakowet died in 1980 and in 1982 Linda moved from San Diego to the Yerkes Primate Research Center in Atlanta. She then came to us in 1995 and was reunited with one of her daughters, Laura, and introduced to the rest of our group. While here she proved herself to be a wonderful foster mother, a caring individual and a dominant force to be dealt with, especially by young males in their ‘obnoxious years’. She will be missed by many, bonobos and humans alike. She leaves behind her seven living offspring, twenty-seven ‘grandchildren’, twenty-two ‘great-grandchildren’ and five ‘great-great-grandchildren’.

More pictures and memories of Linda by Mark Scheuber at…

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/Bonobos/HomePage

If you have any response to Linda’s passing you would like to share at this sight,
Please send them my way.

Changed lines 18-19 from:

Unfortunately all I could find of the ‘ol girl were these. Many years with her we spent watching her control situations, or in these latter months of her life try and control them. She was kind and caring to many young and old. As one of the leading ladies of the troupe she had carried weighted responsibilities. She was also one of the most effective equalizers, settling disputes or nuisance members with swift action. In case of the youngsters not keeping up with the fission/fusion of groups during shifting times, she’d help them along and get them going in the right direction (she and our eldest male, Lody, who is still with us, would have the greatest success at this) She won’t be forgotten by any means. None of the guys (bonobos) could possibly be forgotten through shipment to another zoological institution or by “passing on” here at MCZ. Each individual that is in our troupe hold distinct personalities and develop thier personalities in this incredably diverse group for the years they are with us. Other bonobos passing thought MCZ (those that stay for a few years and move on due to SSP recomendations) bring with them thier skills that our more permanent members pick up on and then hold on to and slip them into thier own personalities. She was an anchor for many years. Her anchor has wieghed. But hopefully soon another will drop into theses sands here among the troupe. There most likely one member here at MCZ that will take up her role someday. Until then, there will be a period when they all will need to settle disputes and the nuisance members with out her help. We’ll all miss her and we’ll most likely wish that she was back when some of the troupe members forget thier place in the troupe.

to:

Unfortunately all I could find of the ‘ol girl were these. Many years with her we spent watching her control situations, or in these latter months of her life try and control them. She was kind and caring to many young and old. As one of the leading ladies of the troupe she had carried weighted responsibilities. She was also one of the most effective equalizers, settling disputes or nuisance members with swift action. In case of the youngsters not keeping up with the fission/fusion of groups during shifting times, she’d help them along and get them going in the right direction (she and our eldest male, Lody, who is still with us, would have the greatest success at this) She won’t be forgotten by any means. None of the guys (bonobos) could possibly be forgotten through shipment to another zoological institution or by “passing on” here at MCZ. Each individual that is in our troupe hold distinct personalities and develop thier personalities in this incredably diverse group for the years they are with us. Other bonobos passing thought MCZ (those that stay for a few years and move on due to SSP recomendations) bring with them thier skills that our more permanent members pick up on and then hold on to and slip them into thier own personalities. She was an anchor for many years. Her anchor has wieghed. But hopefully soon another will drop into theses sands here among the troupe. There most likely one member here at MCZ that will take up her role someday. Until then, there will be a period when they all will need to settle disputes and the nuisance members with out her help. We’ll all miss her and we’ll most likely wish that she was back when some of the troupe members forget thier place in the troupe.

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Remembering Linda Bonobo of Milwaukee County Zoo

Greetings James,

Unfortunately all I could find of the ‘ol girl were these. Many years with her we spent watching her control situations, or in these latter months of her life try and control them. She was kind and caring to many young and old. As one of the leading ladies of the troupe she had carried weighted responsibilities. She was also one of the most effective equalizers, settling disputes or nuisance members with swift action. In case of the youngsters not keeping up with the fission/fusion of groups during shifting times, she’d help them along and get them going in the right direction (she and our eldest male, Lody, who is still with us, would have the greatest success at this) She won’t be forgotten by any means. None of the guys (bonobos) could possibly be forgotten through shipment to another zoological institution or by “passing on” here at MCZ. Each individual that is in our troupe hold distinct personalities and develop thier personalities in this incredably diverse group for the years they are with us. Other bonobos passing thought MCZ (those that stay for a few years and move on due to SSP recomendations) bring with them thier skills that our more permanent members pick up on and then hold on to and slip them into thier own personalities. She was an anchor for many years. Her anchor has wieghed. But hopefully soon another will drop into theses sands here among the troupe. There most likely one member here at MCZ that will take up her role someday. Until then, there will be a period when they all will need to settle disputes and the nuisance members with out her help. We’ll all miss her and we’ll most likely wish that she was back when some of the troupe members forget thier place in the troupe.

I’ll be more than happy to share my photos of the other members of our troupe whenever you’d like to see them. Keep in touch.

Talk to you soon,

Mark Scheuber

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February 09, 2009, at 09:55 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
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Zoo YouTube Channel With Bonobos Feature

http://www.youtube.com/user/MilwaukeeCountyZoo
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February 07, 2009, at 10:18 AM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
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Barbara Bell’s Obituary for Linda Bonobo

Pictures will soon follow.

Just wanted to let you all know that we had to euthanized Linda Bonobo Sunday afternoon. She will be missed. Just wanted to send along a few facts about her that may be of interest to you. She was captured in present day DRC in 1958 at an estimated age of two years. Her first captive home was at the Antwerp Zoo until she went to the San Diego Zoo in 1962. At San Diego, she and her mate, Kakowet (approximately 4 years her junior) produced nearly a dozen infants. Kakowet died in 1980 and in 1982 Linda moved from San Diego to the Yerkes Primate Research Center in Atlanta. She then came to us in 1995 and was reunited with one of her daughters, Laura, and introduced to the rest of our group. While here she proved herself to be a wonderful foster mother, a caring individual and a dominant force to be dealt with, especially by young males in their ‘obnoxious years’. She will be missed by many, bonobos and humans alike. She leaves behind her seven living offspring, twenty-seven ‘grandchildren’, twenty-two ‘great-grandchildren’ and five ‘great-great-grandchildren’.
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November 04, 2008, at 04:53 PM by Tyler Schuster - 1 addition
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Asking ‘Why Do Species Go Extinct?’

A Conversation With Stuart L. Pimm

By CLAUDIA DREIFUS
Published: November 3, 2008 New York Times

For a man whose scholarly specialty is one of the grimmest topics on earth — extinction — Stuart L. Pimm is remarkably chipper. On a recent morning, while visiting New York City, Dr. Pimm, a 59-year-old zoologist, was full of warm stories about the many places he travels: South Africa, Madagascar and even South Florida, which he visits as part of an effort to save the endangered Florida panther. Fewer than 100 survive in the wild. In 2006, Dr. Pimm, who holds the Doris Duke professorship of Conservation Ecology at Duke University, won the Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences, the Nobel of the ecology world.

Q. HOW DOES A PERSON MAKE EXTINCTION THE CENTERPIECE OF A PROFESSIONAL LIFE?

A. In 1978, I went to Hawaii, supposedly a tropical paradise. I am an enthusiastic birder, and I looked forward to getting into the lush forest to view the abundant flora and fauna the islands were famous for. Here you had this rich island chain, out in the midst of the Pacific, full of wondrous birds and plants — a place supposedly richer in natural diversity than even the Galápagos.

I had brought with me field guides to the fauna and flora, all published in the early 1970s. Yet once in the Hawaiian forest, I had a shock: my books were listing species that were extinct — or about to become so. I was in the forest six days a week and I kept thinking, “If I give it enough time, I’ll certainly see most of the species still left.” But I saw very little. In fact, in Hawaii today, I’d say there are only about 10 remaining native land bird species, with another 10 clinging to survival.

So suddenly this extinction business seemed very real. Whenever you’d meet biologists over coffee, there’d be the same conversation: “Do you ever wonder what Hawaii was like before, with 150 species of birds and 1,500 species of plants?” That changed my life.

Q. HOW DID IT DO THAT?

A. Well, I realized that extinction was something that as a scientist, I could study. I could ask, “Why do species go extinct?” and “How fast does it happen?” Once armed with that information, one might do something about it.

I now spend a fair amount of time in Washington, working for laws to protect species. I train young people to do the same. I often tell my students that if they want to become environmental biologists, they have to be prepared to go out into the field at dawn to collect their data and then dress up in a suit in the afternoon to meet the visiting politician.

Q. WHICH WOULD YOU SAY ARE, AT THIS MOMENT, THE MOST ENDANGERED OF THE WORLD’S CREATURES?

A. There are too many to name. Something like 12 percent of all birds, a third of all amphibians and, likely, similarly large numbers of plants are in serious danger, I’d say. What’s more, about 1 percent of all species on the planet are in such trouble that if we don’t do the right things immediately they will be gone in a decade.

The river dolphin in China was declared extinct just last year. Another small dolphin in the Sea of Cortez is in immediate danger.

Q. WHAT CAN ONE PERSON DO TO STOP EXTINCTIONS?

A. One of the things I’ve done is start an NGO — a nongovernmental organization — called SavingSpecies.org. And it does what its title suggests. We’ve been working with local conservation groups and governments in Brazil and Madagascar doing a variety of projects that we hope will halt the potential extinctions there.

One of the things we know is that many endangered animals live over large areas. But their populations become fragmented because of farming and development. The remaining creatures can’t find a date on a Saturday night. So we’ve been trying to buy up degraded land around their broken environments and try to create land corridors for the wildlife.

Q. HAVE YOU HAD ANY SUCCESSES YET?

A. Yes. On the Atlantic Coast of Brazil, we’ve been trying to help save the golden lion tamarin, an endangered primate about the size of a house cat. Last year, with the involvement of local conservationist groups, we helped purchase about 270 acres of cattle pasture that separated two patches of their habitat. This former pasture is now being replanted with trees. The two areas will soon be bridged, and it will be possible for lonely hearts to meet members of the opposite sex and go forth and multiply.

In another South American region I won’t name here, there have been a lot of illegal logs taken. Why? Because a local godfather there was getting kickbacks from loggers. My friends and I decided we’d give him a bit more money and we stopped the illegal logging. I may burn in hell forever for paying protection, but it did help the animals and the indigenous people, who were not subjected to a lot of bad things. In terms of what we got for the money, it was a very good deal.

Q. YOUR GROUP HAS BEEN DOING A LOT OF WORK WITH INDIGENOUS TRIBES. WHY IS THAT IMPORTANT?

A: Because when you set aside indigenous reserves, it reduces deforestation.

There’s another project in Northern Amazonia that my group has been involved in. This particular area is inhabited by indigenous peoples who have clear title to the land in their village. Recently, settlers came into the area, wanting to turn the forests outside of the village — the very places where these people hunt and fish — into rice fields. Their claim was that no one owned the forests. So my Brazilian students and a local Catholic mission have been teaching the tribe’s teenagers the use of modern global positioning technologies — G.P.S. The idea is that G.P.S. can help them can record where they hunt and fish and that will help them define the forest land as theirs. So here’s an example of when we help the local people maintain their traditional ways, we’re helping the flora and the fauna survive.

Q. HOW DO YOU FINANCE SAVINGSPECIES.ORG?

A. We raise money in the traditional way, but we’re also selling symbolic carbon offsets to sympathetic donors.

As you know, when you restore forests, you soak up CO2 from the atmosphere. There are people who’d like to be carbon neutral — they’d like not to burn any more carbon than they are soaking up. So if someone buys an airline ticket and feels badly about all the carbon they’re putting into the atmosphere during that flight, we sell them very beautiful, very cheap offsets from the forest restoration we have done.

We hope that this kind of swap will eventually become a financial obligation in a lot of the world.

Q. ARE YOU RELIGIOUS?

A. I’m a believing Christian. “God so loved the cosmos that he gave his only son.” That’s an injunction from St. John. To me, this says that Christians have an obligation to look after the world — stewardship. We cannot pointlessly drive species to extinction and destroy forests and oceans. When we do that, we are destroying God’s creation.

That said, I’m not a vegetarian. I like a good steak now and then. Do I go out and slaughter cattle? Yep.
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What’s Next in the Law? The Unalienable Rights of Chimps

By ADAM COHEN
Published: July 14, 2008

Spain’s parliament recently passed a resolution granting legal rights to apes. Reaction has been mixed. Peter Singer, a Princeton University bioethics professor and animal liberation activist, declared the vote to be of “world historical significance.” The comedian Stephen Colbert — flashing a photo of a performing chimpanzee — insisted that the new law had better not give apes “the right to not wear a tuxedo and roller skates.”

In fact, it will likely do just that. A nonbinding resolution in Spain, which the Parliament now has to flesh out with more specific laws, allows apes to be kept in zoos but not used in circuses or other kinds of performances. It calls for banning research that harms apes.

With the resolution, Spain becomes the world leader in protecting the rights of apes, but perhaps not for long. Austrian animal rights activists are fighting to have a chimp named Matthew Hiasl Pan declared a person. They have lost so far, but are appealing to the European Court of Human Rights.

Granting legal rights to apes is, of course, easy to mock — and animal rights activists don’t do themselves any favors. In media accounts, they usually come off as loopy — whether it is Matthew’s supporters insisting that “everyone is entitled to a fair trial, even chimps,” or Pedro Pozas, the secretary-general of the Spanish Great Ape Project, declaring “I am an ape.”

The animal rights movement also suffers from association with its least appealing advocates. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals constantly sets back its cause with boneheaded moves, like the ad it ran juxtaposing photos of penned-up animals with starving Jews in concentration camps.

Too often, animal-rights supporters seem to care about animals to the exclusion of people. Leona Helmsley epitomized this strain when she left $12 million to her dog and instructed that virtually all of her multibillion-dollar estate be used to care for dogs.

The anti-animal rights camp, however, does not come off much better. Many base their opposition on the Bible — specifically, the verse in Genesis granting man “dominion” over “every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” It’s hard to see why that should be interpreted as divine endorsement for using chimps in crash tests, or why, even if it were, it should guide secular law.

Animal rights opponents often rely on tired “slippery slope” arguments — that if apes have the right not to be abused, soon goldfish will be able to sue their owners for not changing the water. Even Mr. Singer, who is often branded an animal-rights extremist, says species should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. American laws — notably the Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance and Protection Act — already do this.

Much of the opposition to animal rights is really economic. The campaign against the anti-cruelty referendum that will be on the California ballot this November — to prohibit keeping calves, hens and pigs in inhumanely small cages — is being financed in large part by egg and meat producers.

Strip away the goofier rhetoric of the ape-rights activists, and their claim is straightforward. Great apes are biologically very close to humans; chimps and humans share about 98 percent of their DNA. Apes have complex communication skills and close emotional bonds. They experience loneliness and sorrow. They deserve some respect.

It sounds odd to say that apes have rights — or to call a chimpanzee a “person.” As a legal matter, though, it is not such a stretch. People in irreversible comas have rights. Even corporations are recognized as “persons,” with free speech and equal protection rights, and the ability to sue and be sued.

If apes are given rights, they are not going to get the same ones as humans — just rights that are deemed appropriate to their status. Matthew’s supporters are trying to have him declared a person because his animal sanctuary has had financial trouble, and they want him to be able to accept donations for his own support. It’s hard to see the harm in that.

Critics object that recognizing rights for apes would diminish human beings. But it seems more likely that showing respect for apes would elevate humans at the same time.

American law is becoming increasingly cruel. The Supreme Court recently ruled that states are not obliged to administer lethal injections in ways that avoid unnecessary risk that inmates will suffer great pain. If apes are given the right to humane treatment, it just might become harder to deny that same right to their human cousins.
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Last edited by Tyler Schuster. Based on work by Godsil, Commonwealth Citizen and tyler schuster.  Page last modified on May 07, 2018, at 03:41 PM

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