On this page…

  1. Sweet Water Foundation At Heart Haus May Day Celebration: Todd Leach, Emmanuel Pratt, Jesse Blom, and James Godsil
  2. Cross Continental “Partners”
    1. 2.1  Africa
    2. 2.2  India
    3. 2.3  China
    4. 2.4  Europe
    5. 2.5  UN FAO Gaza
    6. 2.6  North America
    7. 2.7  Australia
  3. Harvesting Bits Atoms Cells
  4. ReThink Factory Help High School Students’ Co-Create A Living Wall
  5. Diversify Teaching by Empowering Our Teachers To Grow, Make, and Co-Create
  6. Earth Nation Eco Tours
  7. From “Made in China” to “Made With China”
  8. Chinese and American Robin Hoods And Virtual Sherwood Forests
  9. Core Tenets of Shanzhai Business Model Worthy of American Attention
  10. San Francisco Chinese American CEO Highway 1 Accelerator Program
  11. The Economist Covering This Development
  12. Silvia Lindtner of U. of Cal. Irvine Shanghai Partnership
  13. EB-5 Immigrant Investor Platform
  14. Aquapons Across the Water And Metagenomics
    1. 14.1  Mukherjee
    2. 14.2  Godsil
    3. 14.3  Lesniewski
    4. 14.4  Li
    5. 14.5  Mukherjee
    6. 14.6  Lesniewski
    7. 14.7  Castro
    8. 14.8  Li
    9. 14.9  Seston
    10. 14.10  Love
    11. 14.11  Godsil
  15. Danny Glover Discovers The Sweet Water Universe at the Sweet Water Foundation Chicago State University Aquaponics Center
  16. Chinese Israel Fuzhou 3,000 Sq Meter Aquaponics Greenhouse
  17. AQUAPON Ecopreneur Incubator & Digital Conferencing House
  18. Social Learning Networks For Resource Management & Education: A Focus On Old House Transformations
  19. Aquaponics As Public Art Installations In World’s Airports?
  20. Internet Connections For Urban Agriculture
  21. Parents and Grandparents Donating Small Aquaponics Demos For Their Childrens’ Schools
  22. Aquaponics Is a New Literacy
  23. Accelerating Chinese American Urban Ag Conversations
  24. Food Security and Safety In China
  25. Farm Together Connects Urban and Rural As “Partners”
  26. New global water center lab replicates and teaches effective water cycle management
  27. Globally Brainstorming Digitally Enhanced Agroecology Eco Tourism Badge Program
  28. On Badges For Learning & Credentialing
  29. Advancing Global Ecological Collaborative Innovation Networks(COINs)
  30. Police Community Peace Garden
  31. Jesuit School Experiments

Sweet Water Foundation At Heart Haus May Day Celebration: Todd Leach, Emmanuel Pratt, Jesse Blom, and James Godsil

Derek Ware, James Godsil, Amanda Williams, and Emmanuel Pratt at Sweet Water Foundation Hyde Park Art Center.
Godsil and Pratt co-founded the Sweet Water Foundation, with Josh Fraundorf and Howard Hinterthuer providing foundational support.

Cross Continental “Partners”

Africa

Nigeria

Malawi

Sierra Leone

Botswana

India

Indo American Aquaponics Institute

Video clip of IAAI Fund-Raising Program: A. Foundation Project

http://youtu.be/qmwNoQdn4L8

St. Alberts College

China

David Li

Stephen Kang

Shi Yan

Chen Hao

IrvingSteel

Europe

Incredible Aquagarden

Franz Schreier

UN FAO Gaza

http://www.agri-tecture.com/post/62993571321/un-introduces-aquaponics-to-urban-farming-in-gaza

North America

here is a very brief intro to aquaponics featuring Jesse Blom of SWF
http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=219593

pbs growing a greener planet series - this one is quite a bit longer, detailed, journalistic….starting with the history of SW Organics, and then detailing SW Foundation’s work in Chicago.

http://www.growingagreenerworld.com/aquaponics-mushroom-growing/

this one is more stylistic, great cinematography, features a few of our team members:
complex tv

http://www.complex.com/tv/city-guide-videos/emmanuel-pratt-bold-moves-series

creative time summit video
http://creativetime.org/summit/2013/10/26/emmanuel-pratt/

wbez video
http://www.wbez.org/sections/food/urban-agriculture-center-creates-more-green-space-109569

Emmanuel Pratt

Jesse Blom

Godsil

Dan Healy

Kenworthy

Eric Maundu

Australia

Interview With Dr. Nicholas Rose, Churchill Fellow/National Coordinator, Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance

Godsil. You have won a Churchill Fellowship and now book contract from your Great Work on the food sovereignty movement in Australia and beyond, guided by the proposition that “(t)he global movement for food sovereignty is perhaps the foremost 21st long tradition of human struggle for freedom, diversity and equality.” Has this movement in Australia become part of any major political leaders’ policy agenda? If so, do any positions stand out for possible inclusion in USA party policy prescriptions? (I am hoping to inspire some food sovereignty activists to win a place in the 2016 Presidential primaries).

Rose. “Yes – to some extent.

The two main parties (Coalition Liberal / National – conservative political grouping, and Australian Labor Party – traditionally the party of the trade unions) have said that they want a strong agriculture and food sector in Australia. However there has for some decades been bipartisan agreement in favour of a policy agenda of free trade, increased commodity production and deregulation, to ‘let the market rip’, as it were. This has fostered a ‘get big or get out’ dynamic which has seen an exodus of farmers from the land (an average of 7–10 per day over the last three decades, likely to double in the next decade) and increasing levels of stress and anxiety, linked to high debt levels of unfavourable terms of trade, for many of those remaining. The recent National Food Plan of the ALP (2010–2013) and the Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper of the Coalition (2013–2014) largely entrench this trajectory.

The National Party was formerly called the ‘Country’ party and its main constituency has always been farmers and rural and regional communities, although with the extreme urbanisation of Australia during the 20th century this political base has shrunk a great deal. Conscious of the hardships that many farmers are experiencing the Nationals have recently raised concerns about food sovereignty-related issues such as increasing external ownership of Australian farmland and infrastructure, the impacts of cheap imported foods on local producers and manufacturers, and the power of the supermarket duopoly (Australia’s two main supermarkets, Coles and Woolworths, control between them 75–80% of the grocery sector – the most concentrated in the world – see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxGsu4lkcIc&app=desktop).

The food sovereignty agenda, as we developed it in the Peoples Food Plan (http://www.australianfoodsovereigntyalliance.org/peoples-food-plan/), was to a significant extent embraced and adapted in the food and agriculture policy that was taken by the Federal Greens party: http://greens.org.au/policies/sustainable-agriculture. This speaks of recognition of the value of urban and peri-urban agriculture, of support for agro-ecology, and the need to invest in localised food systems.

This policy agenda was and is supported by many farmers and rural communities. There is however a deep sense of loyalty to particular parties amongst certain constituencies, even when their policies and platforms run directly counter to the best long-term interests of those very constituencies.

The Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance, as a non-aligned and non-party political organisation, does not affiliate itself with any political party. Obviously we were pleased to see the Federal Greens adopt so much of what we had developed. Our challenge now is to work to make increasing parts of this agenda ‘common sense’ across the food system.

Best

Nick

Harvesting Bits Atoms Cells

The Sweet Water Foundation’s There Grows the Neighborhood initiative brings resources from a global social learning and production network. These networked “partners” include Boomer Millennial Partnerships experimenting ways of harvesting multiple values from mindful configurations of Bits Atoms Cells.

Integral Urban Homes, Agroecology Work Learn Tours, and Community Farms are three initiatives that will be explored at a Sweet Water/Chicago Museum of Science and Industry Hacking Hunger conference in Spring/Summer 2015 at the Perry Avenue Community Farm and Think Do House.

Since its 2010 incorporation, the Sweet Water Foundation has advanced in collaboration with Earth Renaissance”partners” across the waters, as well as some major institutions we are proud to be working with.

Back to top


ReThink Factory Help High School Students’ Co-Create A Living Wall

The living wall was designed by 4 high school students. They were part of a summer program run by Lead 2 Change (http://www.lead2changeinc.org/about.html), as part of their college and career readiness program (http://www.lead2changeinc.org/college-and-career-readiness.html).

The 4 youths (out of a larger group) who were interested in design careers worked with a local organization called Dream Builders (http://www.gofundme.com/9u5p78), started by two UWM alumni, Nick Robinson (Architecture) and Mike Medcalf (Business). Dream Builders crafted a 7-week program to introduce the youths to design. Dream Builders contracted ReThink Factory (https://www.facebook.com/RethinkFactory) to do the 3-week-long design-build stage, which culminated in the living wall structure. This portion of program was a project-based learning experience and design-build project.

There was a lot of assistance on the living wall project, such as from many current UWM students and recent graduates who volunteered their time. Some of the materials were donated by area companies. Home Depot donated the lumber and a few other materials. Northern Sunset Perennials donated some of the plants. The 4 high school students received some design advice from architects at various area architecture firms. Much support was received from the UWM Office of Sustainability, the Facilities Department, the Office of Safety, the staff and faculty of School of Architecture and Urban Planning, especially the custodial staff in the architecture building and the folks in the SARUP workshop. The workshop staff helped us with some set up, materials and the use of the workshop. The living wall was constructed entirely in the workshop and assembled by the 4 students and the volunteers on site.

The living wall is designed to be self-irrigating. The timer kicks in at 9.00 am and at 3.00 pm and runs for 15 minutes. It also has a water feature: a rain chain that creates a soothing sound. The system is still being tweaked to make sure it is more self-regulating. Architecture student volunteers are being trained to take over the maintenance.

It was conceived as a gift from high school community members to the greater community - specifically to the design school - a reversal of typical community engagement projects. A project such as this has several potential benefits;

1. Educational - ReThink Factory endeavors to tie each step to some curricular aspect, for instance measuring and cutting to mathematics, flow rates to maths and physics, plant life to chemistry and biology etc… How better to learn about photosynthesis. Even when the system they construct does not work as planned, they consider it still a great learning experience. The other educational aspect is in ecological literacy. Learners begin to understand how water and other resources flow and the production and consequences of waste.

2. Socio-political - ReThink Factory tries to engage learners in decision making. They are introduced to what is considered acceptable practice in the profession or discipline in question, and why (the pros and cons). They are also introduced to different aspects of how such rules are made to encourage them to participate in making and changing the rules if they desire.

3. reThink Factory attempts to expand participants analytic, design, construction and critical skills. What better worker to have than one who can analyze a problem, design a solution, consider said solution, construct it and reanalyze it for further potential improvement.

Here are some images of this project;
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.864580910233074.1073741829.425612297463273&type=1

ReThink Factory is a nonprofit started by Adam Spoerri and NJ Unaka. Other examples of their multiple design-build projects that involve students in doing community development work;
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.649314758426358.1073741826.425612297463273&type=1
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.232571356911440.1073741829.230220607146515&type=1

Diversify Teaching by Empowering Our Teachers To Grow, Make, and Co-Create

A New York Times discussion on “How to Diversify Teaching”
http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/09/11/how-to-diversify-teaching?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visible&module=inside-nyt-region&region=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region

The teaching profession is dominated by women: Three-quarters of all teachers in kindergarten through high school are female, and in elementary and middle schools, women account for more than 80 percent of the educators.

What’s more, more than 80 percent of America’s teachers are white, even though minority students are expected to outnumber white students for the first time this year.

How can the teaching profession become more diverse in terms of gender and race or ethnicity?

By empowering the willing and able teachers with skills to grow food, fix and make everyday things for living, and co-create networked communities of learning and doing. Sweet Water Foundation Director Emmanuel Pratt brings great resources to this venture from a variety of sources, including HIVE Chicago. http://hivechicago.org/

And I am hoping that Jesse Blom’s Sweet Water Foundation/Milwaukee Public School “teachers corp” now studying aquaponics might team up with Emmanuel’s Chicago netowrk and growing groups like the Victory Garden Initiative and making groups like Milwaukee Makers and Engineers Without Borders to provide new reasons to become a teacher, including summer gigs where our teachers share their new found skills in other schools districts.

Earth Nation Eco Tours

Introducing Grass Roots American and Chinese Collaboration To Marry Urban Agriculture With Thinker Makers Agile Manufacturing

Yesterday Shanghai’s David Li introduced me to China’s Eric Pan to accelerate our shared commitment to “ecopreneur” collaborations across the waters, with a start up focus on urban agriculture and agile manufacturing. At the time I was with three of America’s top matchmakers of this union, Emmanuel Pratt, Franklyn Berry, and Jia Li Lok Pratt, who were delighted, as this picture suggests, by the prospect of teaming up with David and Eric. I asked David to send me some digital links to essays that would inform our work and share the good news. Here is the first article he sent, followed by some of my favorite quotes therein.

http://www.hackedmatter.com/news/2014/5/19/state-of-shanzhai

From “Made in China” to “Made With China”

As China’s DIY makers are coming together with manufacturers, they are spurring a shift in industrial production, from “made in China” to “made with China.”

Chinese and American Robin Hoods And Virtual Sherwood Forests

David Li, co-founder of XinCheJian, Shanghai’s first “maker space” (essentially, an open-access workshop), says the Robin Hood spirit is inspiring legitimate and often quite innovative products, as the socially progressive maker movement teams up with hard-nosed manufacturers.

From watches, bags and shoes to touchscreen tablets, fast food and electric cars — you can find thousands of knockoff brands in China. Large, highly coordinated networks of innovative companies take the products and services we love in the U.S., alter them relentlessly and make them … better. Then they speed them to one of the world’s largest consumer markets and sell them at devastatingly low margins.

Core Tenets of Shanzhai Business Model Worthy of American Attention

The problem with U.S. innovation? Our broken business models. American companies were built to be predictable, not adaptable. Trends like mobile, social and the cloud are major disruptive forces and businesses are struggling to keep up. Instead of fearing the Shanzhai, we can look at their 4 core tenets to reorganize the way we do business:

-Build nothing from scratch
-Innovate process at small scales
-Share as much as you can
-Act responsibly in the network

By adopting the philosophy of the Shanzhai “copycat culture,” companies can innovate faster and remain competitive.

But China’s rapid growth in open source hardware and maker communities challenges our assumptions. They show an alternative version of innovation, built on a home-grown version of open source that has developed in China’s small-scale factories over the last 20 years. Makers in China show that this history of open manufacturing will change not only what we understand by making, but also where we locate innovation.

San Francisco Chinese American CEO Highway 1 Accelerator Program

PCH a major manufacture based in Shenzhen has recently launch an accelerator program Highway1 in San Francisco and here is how the CEO’s take on Shanzhai:

WSJ: Why is Shenzhen still attractive for PCH?

Casey: The “shanzhai” culture is really important (Shanzhai literally means “mountain fortress.” Once a term used to suggest something cheap or inferior, shanzhai now suggests to many a certain Chinese cleverness and ingenuity.) It has this disruptive culture of wanting to be different, of wanting to be fast, wanting to show what’s possible.

The Economist Covering This Development

The Economist has also published several articles on how Shanzhai will be relevant to the innovation in China and the potential to change now new hardware are created.

What gives these young Chinese firms a potential edge is their close connections with the so-called shanzhai production networks centred on Shenzhen, China’s high-tech manufacturing hub. The term shanzhai is often used pejoratively to refer to Chinese copycat producers of mobile phones and other electronic devices, based on copied designs and knock-off brand names. But its literal meaning is “mountain village”, and it refers to bandits who opposed corrupt rulers and hid in the countryside—much like Robin Hood in English folklore. David Li, co-founder of XinCheJian, Shanghai’s first “maker space” (essentially, an open-access workshop), says the Robin Hood spirit is inspiring legitimate and often quite innovative products, as the socially progressive maker movement teams up with hard-nosed manufacturers.

Silvia Lindtner of U. of Cal. Irvine Shanghai Partnership

Silvia Lindtner of the University of California, Irvine, and Fudan University in Shanghai, who follows the startup scene in China, is not surprised. The two sides complement each other, she says. The founders of hardware start ups, often steeped in the open-source culture, partner with factories rooted in the Chinese culture of shanzhai, which translates as “mountain stronghold”. It used to mean pirated electronic goods but now stands for open-source manufacturing.

Much more to come!

Godsil

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Platform

Made a commitment to Shanghai’s David Li to brainstorm this program for the next 31 years, and perhaps also work to refine the metrics so they more obviously advance our transition from industrial to ecological cities.

Click here and join the conversation.

EB-5 Immigrant Investor Platform

Aquapons Across the Water And Metagenomics

Mukherjee


Forwarded message ----------

From: “Subhrankar Mukherjee” <subra@sankalpacmfs.org>
Date: May 25, 2014 5:42 AM
Subject: Develop a few grant project proposals on Biotechnology
To: “James Godsil” <godsil.james@gmail.com>
Cc: “Ken Kenworthy” <kkenworthy@knowledgerealm.com>

Dear Godsil,

It was good speaking with Ken and you last night. Later on, I had a brief
chat session with Jason Axt.

During our brief conversation, I mentioned that I have been tasked by Dr.
Lakra, Vice-Chancellor and Director of CIFE, Mumbai — whom I believe you
met during your last visit to India — to develop a few grant project
proposals that we could submit to the Department of Biotechnology (DBT),
Government of India. These can be in the region of, say, Rs 2 - 3
millions (about $35 - 50K), which is quite a significant amount of money
for a 2-year project, in India. As Dr. Lakra is a Member of this funding
body, we can reasonably expect that we have a leg up in getting our
project proposals approved.

However, my knowledge of Biotechnology is nothing to write home about. Ken
suggested that perhaps David could be a helpful partner and resource in
this enterprise. I was hoping that Ken and you could help me to design and
develop a couple of project proposals, perhaps around the following
topics:

(a) Applied Research of new biotechnology approaches for Aquaponics and
Spirulina

(b) Bioinformatics Approaches and Metagenomic Analysis of Aquaponic Systems

What say you?

Regards,

Subra.

Godsil

Dr. Subra Mukherjee has been steadfastly advancing aquaponics demos with serious backing in Mumbai and Kolkata region. In the note below he shares an opportunity to explore metagenomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology research possibilities for aquaponics and spirulina development

If this interests you or any of your colleagues across the planet, please let me know and it would be my honor to provide introductions to this wonderful visionary founder of the Indo American Aquaponics Institute.

Happy Spring!

Godsil

Lesniewski

Hi James,

You contacted the right person at the right time! I would love to help with the development of a project focusing on the metagenomic analysis of an aquaponic system. I have thought long and hard about this, and already have a draft proposal prepared. Please introduce me to your affiliates and I would be happy to work with them on proposal design. I have attached one of my publications relating to my experience with metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis.

Hope all is well with you.

best,

Ryan

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?shva=1#search/metagenomics/14632f980539a2be?projector=1

Li

Awesome! Biohacking aquapons! ;)

This is awesome!

I think we first need to develop a protocol about how to process metagenomic in aquaponics?

Mukherjee

This is a note to Ryan Lesniewski.

I am delighted to know that you would be willing to help with the
development of a project focusing on the metagenomic analysis of an
aquaponic system.

At the outset, I have to say that I have no knowledge of biotechnology,
let alone metagenomics. My interest in this subject has been promoted by
following the threads of various email exchanges initiated by Godsil, and
most recently this one with you. I sincerely think that a successful
metagenomic analysis of our own AP system, would help us to determine how
to build robust and productive AP Systems, in general.

Allow me to introduce myself. I am the Project Manager of an effort to
build an “Aquaponics & Spirulina Eco Park” (ASEP) at the Central Institute
for Fisheries Education (CIFE) at Mumbai — the premium fisheries
institution in India, where there are a number of fine researchers in the
field of biotechnology. You can learn more about this project from a
“Concept Note” that is posted online at:
[http://www.sankalpacmfs.org/asep/Concept.ASEPm.pdf].

I am also the Project Manager of a “Backyard Aquaponics Center” (BAC)
project being built in at Village in West Bengal, India. The objective is
to demonstrate that Aquaponics technology is indeed profitable and
sustainable for farmers in India. A ‘Concept Note’ on this project is
posted on-line at:
[http://www.sankalpacmfs.org/src/wp/BAC.cn.pdf].

As I explained in my email to Godsil, as the Project Manager of the ASEP
Project and on behalf of CIFE, I wish to submit a proposal to the
Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India, on the metagenomic
analysis of the aquaponic system that we are building at CIFE, in Mumbai.
As the Vice-Chancellor of CIFE — the person who has tasked me with this
idea — and the CIFE Champion of the ASEP Project are both panel members
of the DBT, I am hopeful that our proposal would be viewed favorably. In
closure, let me add that I would be happy to act as the facilitator to
connect a bunch of biotechnologists at CIFE with you, so that an effective
‘collaboration across the waters’ can be initiated, leading to the
submission of a suitable project proposal to DBT, focusing on the
metagenomic analysis of the aquaponic system that we are building at CIFE,
in Mumbai …. and perhaps also the one we are building in the village in
West Bengal. Might we not extend the project to include a metagenomic
analysis of spirulina microalgae?

What say you?

With warm regards,

Lesniewski

Hi Subra,

This is a lot to chew on, but it really looks like your are doing some great work so far! I am very excited about the potential to partner and work on a proposal to do metagenomic analysis of aquaponic systems. I am quite familiar with two of the largest metagenome surveys to have ever been done: the global ocean sampling expedition (GOS) and the human microbiome project. Both of these large and ongoing projects have provided many new insights to the microbiology of our bodies and our oceans, but these projects have also highlighted many of the challenges of analyzing such a complex and dynamic dataset.

In some ways, studying an aquaponic system will be simpler than looking at the ocean, or the human microbiome. This is because we can control the inputs, know what macrospecies we inoculate (example: lettuce and tilapia), and we have a good overall understanding of the initial conditions. On the other hand, we are dealing with one of the most complex systems on the planet: the soil microbiome (albeit minus the soil). The relationships and interactions of plants and microbes have evolved over billions of years, and thanks to the abundant energy of the sun, the diversity of this micro world is as diverse as the organisms in a dense rainforest.

Okay, so what does this mean? Well, it means that our strategy for studying aquaponic systems will have to accommodate for this inherent complexity, both on a spatial and temporal scale. In general, we will have to have simple control experiments that we start from scratch, in replication, in order to understand exactly how the system was established and how it changes over time. The data between our replicates will give us an idea of consistency between to very similar systems. Once we have this data, we can then compare it to many other existing aquaponic systems to see whether or not our simple experiments agree with the greater findings.

It also means we have two general options for analyzing the microbial communities in these systems: we can look at membership (e.g. what are the names of the organisms present in the system over time), or we can look at function (e.g. what are the organisms in the system doing, such as organic carbon breakdown, nitrification, etc.). Based on the findings of the GOS and the human microbiome, a functional analysis seems to be the most effective at finding similarities between different samples (e.g. different humans, different locations in the surface ocean).

In short, my opinion is that in order to do a proper metagenomic analysis of aquaponic systems, we need significant resources, including many sample sites (with data of how that system is/was operated over time), research funding for sequencing (30–50k$ seems about right), and a team of people that are capable of analyzing the data. Although I am excited and happy to help, the timing of this will likely conflict with my own research obligations for my PhD, so we will require many more “hands on deck”.

Hopefully this was somewhat clear, and lays a general framework for the type of project I have in mind. I have a draft of a proposal that generally follows this strategy, but it will have to be adapted to focus on the different systems you have in mind.

Regarding including the metagenomic analysis of spirulina microalgae: the definition of metagenomics is looking at the genomes of a complex community. Spirulina is only one species, so we could do just a genomic analysis of the algae (which I think has actually already been done), unless you are interested in looking at the other organisms that co-exist with it.

I hope this was helpful,

Best,

Ryan

Castro

Greetings Everyone!

I am an Industrial Designer/Microfarm designer and an aspiring social entrepreneur. We have developed a closed loop microfarm that has an integrated soil recycling system, composting, and vermiculture systems integrate into the unit. The unit that takes up a square meter and may produce upwards of 45–50 kilos of Sunflower microgreens per month. The only inputs are seeds, water, power, air labor/love. I would be happy to work with the project to design an Educational Microfarm for any and all Eco Parks!

I am beginning a startup accelerator in June and working to bring these systems to mass production in a manner that enables the systems to pay for themselves within 2 months. This system may be a great fit for a simple system for research. I envision a network of these systems that enables parallel research and observations from actual people working to transform their lives with these practices.

I have some unique life experiences, knowledge, and skills that may contribute to a successful endeavor.

Li

Hi Miguel,

Sounds like a great system. Would love to learn more about it!

Which accelerator are you joining in? Haxlr8r or Highway1?

Seston

Subra and Ryan,

I am a microbiologist and Associate Professor at Alverno College in Milwaukee, WI and have interest in aquaponics as microbial nitrogen transformations are one of my research focuses and I come from a farming background. I also recently completed a sabbatical at the Georgia Institute of Technology where I was involved in the metatranscriptomic analysis of endosymbiotic bacteria in snails at deep sea hydrothermal vents. Alverno College is an undergraduate institution and as such we have very little research going on here, but my main goal after my sabbatical is to start research projects on campus that my undergraduate students can participate in. I would love to be involved in this research. I think I could contribute some hands and brains that could be part of analyzing sequence, functional (activity), and production data from aquaponics systems. My students would be very motivated and capable of doing at least some of the analysis. However, I couldn’t contribute to the actual sequencing activities and we would mostly do restricted to performing our analyses online as we don’t have much computing power.

Ryan, you are spot on in your analysis and description of the microbiology of the system and I agree that a functional approach would be the most exciting, although the “membership” approach may also be interesting in regards to plant or fish pathogens. Subra, what are your next steps? Are there sequencing facilities available to the Indian team? Where or how many different systems do you envision comparing?

I look forward to developing these ideas further!

Sherry Seston

Love

Hi Ryan, Sherry et al,

I too am a microbiologist and on the faculty in the dept of Environmental Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins. I manage a research and demonstration aquaponics farm in baltimore, md.

I think basic science funders (NSF) and Agriculture funders (USDA) would both be interested in proposals using genomics tools applied to aquaponics.

Please include me on your email chain moving fwd; id like to find a way to contribute.

Dave Love

Godsil

Please see microbiologist Sherry Seston of Alverno note to Subra and Ryan below…

Revelations of nature
Increasingly accessible.

Discovering integral practices
For more balanced developments.

Co-creating 21st Century international hybrid culture
With nature “partners”…
Fish, plants, bacteria…
And humans.

Widening circles of collaboration…

Grateful,

Godsil

P.S. I attached my CV just as a way of introduction to my areas of expertise.

Danny Glover Discovers The Sweet Water Universe at the Sweet Water Foundation Chicago State University Aquaponics Center

Grace Lee Boggs and Richard Feldman have long partnered with Danny Glover, the Sweet Water Foundation, and the expanding web of “new workers” advancing the next American ®Evolution from their Detroit Boggs Center myriad projects. The Sweet Water experiment was introduced to Grace and community the same week of Obama’s 2008 election, before ground was broken for the Sweet Water Organics(SWO) experiment, and before the Sweet Water Foundation(SWF) was formalized.

Emmanuel Pratt, director of the Sweet Water Foundation, and James Godsil, President of the Board, have since visited the Boggs community once or twice a year, and maintained a steady flow of reports and partnerships, including participation in Re-imagine Work Conferences, and a magical Sweet Water day in Chicago with Access Living.

Glover’s visit was inspired by Feldman’s telling Glover that he “has to see this new work place…There’s nothing like it!”

Here are some Emmanuel Pratt pictures of the visit.
https://plus.google.com/photos/100043881418669189803/albums/6009818737938062993?authkey=CMKgt46nrLf5iQE

Chinese Israel Fuzhou 3,000 Sq Meter Aquaponics Greenhouse

I was in Fuzhou agriculture research yesterday and there is a Sino-Isreal joint agro industrial park. One of the interesting setup there is a large scale aquaponics system with 3000 square meter green house and 1500 square meter fish pond on a hill. Pretty cool!

AQUAPON Ecopreneur Incubator & Digital Conferencing House

So the high school AQUAPON demos and experiments Sweet Water Foundation has sparked since 2010 in Milwaukee and Chicago schools has given rise to a group of young people competent to lead workshops on the design, construction, and stewarding of small aquaponics systems.

I
These workshops could be dramatically enhanced were they to occur in a setting that had digital conferencing resources to carry the workshops
beyond the physical place of their occurrence.

The Old House Transformations could include such a program.

Students teaching communities aquaponics!

Social Learning Networks For Resource Management & Education: A Focus On Old House Transformations

So I and “partners” are exploring a project I hope will share the bounty of
science enhanced, digitally connected urban agriculture in service to the renewal of old American(and perhaps beyond) cities and urban/rural partnerships. I hope you and many others will join in an email brainstorm and wiki open source chronicling, God willing.

There are two old 100+ year old homes under consideration for this experiment. One is in a primarily European American neighborhood in Bay View, Milwaukee.

Euclid Brisbane House

The other in a primarily African American and Hmong neighborhood in Walnut Hill, Milwaukee.

And there is an entire city block of duplexes and an historic Masonic Temple, Mother Clara’s Gingerbread Land, that, God willing, will profit from this brainstorm, and perhaps entwine with this project.

I aspire to engage a local, regional, national, and global “social learning network for resource management and education” in this adventure. Micah’s Lewis and Clarke senior thesis introduced me to this rich guiding, “project algorithm.” I hope the work on theses two homes is complimentary to one another’s transformation. And, open sourcing this experiment, I hope the lessons learned will increase chances for success for other similar efforts like the Gingerbread First Street Renaissance.

At this moment, key to this vision is integrating the followinig:

  • Mitra’s Hole In The Wall Education, with young and old learners

http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves

  • some kind of eChoupal digital kiosk resource for the surrounding community’s micro producers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-Choupal

  • hopefully aquaponics demos and urban ag workshops

http://sweetwaterfoundation.com/

I am hoping you will consider minimally being “nanosecond patners” to this project. This means that you will remember this email and share the concept with people you think will be interested in becoming a member of the social learning network, old house focus, Spring and Summer 2014.

What say?

Why not?

Godsil

old house transformations

Aquaponics As Public Art Installations In World’s Airports?

Given our recent network of partners/collaborators with expertise in kinesthetic structures and interns in industrial design being converted to AQUAPONS, seems like a no brainer.

I’ve looped in Jim Robinett from the Shedd Aquarium into this convo. Also thinking we need to bring in some contacts from the Museum of Science and Industry as well (just need to think through whom from our existing contacts would be the right team).

If not airports, there are a range of other public spaces which would definitely work with the right team assembled.

On a smaller scale and as a more immediate project, an immediate thought is that I’d like to invite the team from Cannon Design and Shedd Aquarium to join in one of the upcoming design crits with IIT regarding our Culture Stand project with the Wormfarm Institute.

Below is a brief on the design/build studio underway this semester with Eva Kulterman’s Architecture design studio at IIT:

An individual’s access to fresh fruits and vegetables is vital to physical health and well-being. Food is an integral part of culture and self-identity. As the issue of food availability becomes more of a national focus, the disparity between affluent and low- income communities is apparent in the availability and variety of fresh produce. Local food based industries promote the productive use of public and private lands to improve access to good nutrition.

This studio is involved in the design and construction of a Roadside Culture Stand in collaboration with the Wormfarm Institute and the Sweet Water Foundation. Culture Stands are architect/artist designed mobile farm stands used to display display and sell fresh local produce produce along with the work of local artists.

As part of the Sweet Water Foundation, the culture stand will vend local produce across a network of sites throughout Chicago and serve as an informational kiosk to attract and direct visitors to other agricultural and cultural attractions. The project will also investigate the collaborative possibilities of utilizing the arts as a marketing vehicle for local farmers’ products

See links below and pics attached of examples of our work over the years exploring aquaponics as public art.

http://www.hydeparkart.org/events/2011-09-01-open-studio-emmanuel-pratt [The MYCELIA Project]

video overview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFNp7la4Jng

http://watershedmke.wordpress.com/about/ (see pics attached)

SWF/4240 Architecture Collaboration for the Design International; The MYCELIA Project (see pic attached and pdf description attached)
http://www.diffachicago.org/DBD_2012_Tables/DBD%202012%20Tables/content/Haworth%2017.39.52_large.html

Sweet Water Foundation + Kennedy King Washburne Culinary Institute The MYCELIA Project Installation for “Culinology & The Future of Food” event & series (see pic SWF_KKC vertical garden photo)

Sweet Water Foundation partnership with Chicago State University; buildout and transformation of the former shoe warehouse at 9601 S Cottage Grove Ave as continuation of THE MYCELIA PROJECT
(See photos attached and link here http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/April-2013/2013-Green-Awards-Emmanuel-Pratt/) also see https://www.chicagoideas.com/events/280

Sweet Water Foundation “Built for Art” [Extension of The MYCELIA Project] (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.194228790639664.50549.142914895771054&type=3)

Sweet Water Foundation + Growing Networks Aquaponics and Art Installation (http://growingnetworks.weebly.com/)

Sweet Water Foundation Bradley Tech Aquaponics in the Classroom (with art mural) see photo attached

Sweet Water Foundation Aquaponics as Art (http://sweetwaterfoundation.com/aquaponics-as-art/)
Upcoming : Art Residency with Provisions Library (http://provisionslibrary.com/research/residencies/)

Emmanuel

Dear Subra, Nate, Emmanuel, Jesse, Franklyn, David, Chaya, Jay, Eva, and Sandy,

Franklyn is an engineer providing design and engineering for major public art, including kinetic varieties.

He and Jesse inspired the vision of an aquaponics public art installation, most grandly conceived for the Smithsonian, but many other public places would be greatly enhanced by such art alive.

Two different Smithsonian staffers reached out to Sweet Water these past few years.

Re open the exchange?

Why not?

Emmanuel Pratt

Aquaponics as public art is the central theme of The MYCELIA Project…

Our team with SWF has done at least 6 installations with aquaponics as ‘living public art’ over the years.

I’m working with a couple more galleries in Chicago who have inquired.

Lets make it happen.

Here is most recent one in Milwaukee http://sweetwaterfoundation.com/aquaponics-as-art/

http://www.hydeparkart.org/events/2011-09-01-open-studio-emmanuel-pratt [The MYCELIA Project]
video overview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFNp7la4Jng

http://watershedmke.wordpress.com/about/ (see pics attached)

SWF/4240 Architecture Collaboration for the Design International; The MYCELIA Project (see pic attached and pdf description attached)
http://www.diffachicago.org/DBD_2012_Tables/DBD%202012%20Tables/content/Haworth%2017.39.52_large.html

Sweet Water Foundation + Kennedy King Washburne Culinary Institute The MYCELIA Project Installation for “Culinology & The Future of Food” event & series (see pic SWF_KKC vertical garden photo)

Sweet Water Foundation partnership with Chicago State University; buildout and transformation of the former shoe warehouse at 9601 S Cottage Grove Ave as continuation of THE MYCELIA PROJECT
(See photos attached and link here http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/April-2013/2013-Green-Awards-Emmanuel-Pratt/) also see https://www.chicagoideas.com/events/280

Sweet Water Foundation “Built for Art” [Extension of The MYCELIA Project] (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.194228790639664.50549.142914895771054&type=3)

Sweet Water Foundation + Growing Networks Aquaponics and Art Installation (http://growingnetworks.weebly.com/)

Sweet Water Foundation Bradley Tech Aquaponics in the Classroom (with art mural) see photo attached

Sweet Water Foundation Aquaponics as Art (http://sweetwaterfoundation.com/aquaponics-as-art/)

Upcoming : Art Residency with Provisions Library (http://provisionslibrary.com/research/residencies/)

We also have a collaboration with Worm Farm Institute and IIT doing a culture stand which will be programmed specifically for art & food & culture

http://sweetwaterfoundation.com/aquaponics-as-art/

Internet Connections For Urban Agriculture

Lately I have been using google alert to specify which key terms I want info on (food waste, food systems, urban agriculture, etc). You can specify how frequently you get your alerts (I receive a summarized email daily). Google alerts is very good for following news items although its not as useful for new reports, online discussions and updated urls. I like Google Alerts because it brings the info into my inbox rather than me searching for it.

More recently, compare to the awesome City Farmer News, we launch an Internet site to “tag” urban agriculture experiences and research. http://www.agriurbain.hypotheses.org

Besides going on various websites, I created a Twitter list for food organisations, probably not complete at all but I add things up little by little, and this is how I get latest and targeted information easily:
Tweet feeds: https://twitter.com/NicolasGrx/lists/food-organisations
List members: https://twitter.com/NicolasGrx/food-organisations/members

Reasons: easy scanning, latest updates, targeted information (saving searching time).

It is not specific to urban agriculture, but I guess it be can of interest for you.

All the best,

Nicolas Giroux

Parents and Grandparents Donating Small Aquaponics Demos For Their Childrens’ Schools

Some parents in Chicago have reached out to the Sweet Water Foundation
to partner with their childrens’schools for modestly priced aquaponics
demonstrations for science, math, environmental, and technology classes.

Aquaponics Is a New Literacy

And a path to vital competencies!

Your child or young adult
Will create with teachers and friends,
A small world of life and abundance.

Imagine your child

Learning how to build something
That is teeming with healthy life
That combines to provide sweet teasting food!

Discussing how to translate
Digital designs into tanks for fish,
Platforms for plants, pumps for water flows,
Lighting for photosynthesis,
Designs for real life eco systems!

Food for family and friends!
Experience for deep practical and spiritual learning.

Accelerating Chinese American Urban Ag Conversations

Is anyone interested in sparking dialogues with Chinese urban ag, aquaponics, water stewarding, and “makers” activists?

David Li combines urban ag through aquaponics (http://blog.shanghaiaquaponics.com/) with his founding role in a Shanghai “Makers” project(http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Xinchejian). The “Wall Street Journal” covered his Makers story(http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303722604579111253495145952). He is very interested in sharing innovations in small scale urban farming and small scale urban manufacturing, including desk top production of aquaponics system components.

Here are a couple of concepts from a recent David Li essay to inspire this dialogue vision.

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/EarthRenaissance/HomePage

Chinese Mayors Mandated To Guarantee 70% of Daily Veggies Grown In City Limit

From the perspective of Shanghai, food security isn’t much an issue, especially when it comes to the fresh vegetables. There is a national policy called “vegetables basket” mandating every mayor in China has to guarantee 70% of the daily vegetables to be produced with in the city limit. The city track these sagas and published daily wholesales price of over 200 vegetables. This makes interesting urban planning and let us have access to plenty of farmlands at very affordable price with in 30 miles of the city center. In the city, wet markets are in all neighborhoods providing access to fresh vegetables among other at very affordable price.

“Farm Together” Experiment: Urbanites Pay Farmers In Terms of Square Meters, Not Kilograms

Farm Together is one of our answers to this. We are connecting urbanites to the farms and farmers around the city and have the concept of “Buying safe and healthy food by square meter.”

Basically, urbanites will pay farmers to farm for them but pay in term of square meters instead of kilogram. This frees up the farmers’ risks in ensuring enough production to sustain their income and shift the risks to the much better off urbanites who can actually get vegetables for less then their yearly Starbucks spending. It also remove the incentives of using chemical fertilizers. And in the same time, we can double farmers’ income.

Any feedback and comments are welcome! Farm Together is still work in progress and we are launching the pilot in March this year.

Wall Street Journal re David Li’s Xinchejian, i.e “new workshop.”

Lone inventors have long tinkered in garages. But today, inventors can use software to design objects to be produced by desktop machines like 3-D printers. They can get funded on Kickstarter. And thanks to the Internet, DIY is thoroughly collaborative. Rather than work on projects in secret, people freely share their ideas and designs online. Chris Anderson, former editor in chief of Wired, describes makers as “the Web generation creating physical things rather than just pixels on screens.”

David Li at Xinchejian

Xinchejian, founded in 2010, means “new workshop.” It occupies a rented room in a Shanghai warehouse. Members pay around $16 a month to use the space and tools, and on Wednesday nights it is open to the public. The Taiwan-born David Li, a 40-year-old programmer and a co-founder of Xinchejian, wants to lower the barriers for experimentation and play. “It’s not about getting together a group of geeks doing something. It’s a conduit for people to say, ‘This interactive stuff is not that scary, not that difficult.’”

The Chinese government has taken an interest in the maker movement. Not long after Xinchejian opened its doors, Shanghai officials announced a plan to build 100 government-supported innovation houses. Last November, according to Mr. Li, the Communist Youth League of Shanghai helped to attract over 50,000 visitors to a Maker Carnival, where makers exhibited their creations to the public.

Officials have also visited Xinchejian, and for now, Mr. Li sees their involvement as a positive development. He notes that the lack of accountability in the Chinese political system sometimes encourages innovation and risk-taking. “The policy makers we meet here are genuinely very curious. They have the resources. They are not afraid to try,” he says. “They could build bridges to nowhere, and they will still have a job.”

Food Security and Safety In China

By David Li, Shanghai Ecopreneur Combining Aquaponics & Makers Movements

From the perspective of Shanghai, food security isn’t much an issue, especially when it comes to the fresh vegetables. There is a national policy called “vegetables basket” mandating every mayor in China has to guarantee 70% of the daily vegetables to be produced with in the city limit. The city track these sagas and published daily wholesales price of over 200 vegetables. This makes interesting urban planning and let us have access to plenty of farmlands at very affordable price with in 30 miles of the city center. In the city, wet markets are in all neighborhoods providing access to fresh vegetables among other at very affordable price.

The well being of the farmers have become the #1 priority of the current national administration as policy on “family farms” have been front and center in the administration’s policy document.

Plus, the food security is also priority #1 in China with over 200 millions still live under the poverty line as less then $1/day defined by UN and the stablization of these groups determine the future of China. One analysis shows the Arab Spring is partially caused by China buying up flour and drive the price up in the international markets and cause food security problem in the already high unemployement regions.

In short, food security is least of our concern when it comes to China in general and Shanghai in particular.

I have given an hour talk on this in Hongkong university Shanghai campus to a group of architects a while ago.

http://vimeo.com/m/81974999

We probably have to emphasize on the food safety and sustainable practices of farming. The WTO entry came with a concession restricting China from making agriculture subsidizes. One of the way for China to get around this is to manipulate the price of chemical materials for chemical fertilizers and pesticide which in term driving down the cost for chemical fertilizers and pesticide. Long term uses of this has its consequence on the productivity of the lands but the restriction on farm subsidizes and artificially low price of chemicals are taking the farming here in a downward spiral. And as the productivity of the lands get worse in China, the greater the needs to buy on international markets. With it’s purchasing power and 1.3 billions people to feed, it would makes this food security problems for everyone around the world.

The question for us in China become how we can push for more sustainable practices while it really cost much more to farm organically in China.

Farm Together Connects Urban and Rural As “Partners”

Farm Together is one of our answers to this. We are connecting urbanites to the farms and farmers around the city and have the concept of “Buying safe and healthy food by square meter.”

Basically, urbanites will pay farmers to farm for them but pay in term of square meters instead of kilogram. This frees up the farmers’ risks in ensuring enough production to sustain their income and shift the risks to the much better off urbanites who can actually get vegetables for less then their yearly Starbucks spending. It also remove the incentives of using chemical fertilizers. And in the same time, we can double farmers’ income.

Any feedback and comments are welcome! Farm Together is still work in progress and we are launching the pilot in March this year.

David

New global water center lab replicates and teaches effective water cycle management

Milwaukee, WI, Jan 28, 2014 – Mahattil International has opened NEW Works in the Global Water Center in Milwaukee, WI. NEW Works offers hands-on training for all water management professionals. State-of-the-art FESTO lab equipment simulates the complete water cycle, from source to wastewater treatment and all steps in between. An open house is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 10, 2014.

The NEW Works mission is to train professionals, accelerate technology transfer, and transform communities using appropriate technologies for water management. To that end, NEW Works has developed six hands-on and practical learning courses to quickly train water management professionals in the following: Water Purification, Water Supply, Wastewater Transport, Wastewater Treatment, Monitoring & Controlling Operations, and Energy Optimization in Water Treatment Plants.

“For all of the aspirations of incorporating the latest development of water technology it is still essential to have superbly trained talent operating the systems,” stated Dean Amhaus, president & CEO of The Water Council. “This is where NEW Works comes in as it will be a tremendous resource and asset in meeting this training demand.”

Housed in the Flow Lab on the first floor of the Global Water Center, the lab simulates the entire water cycle with four different stations: Water Purification, Water Supply, Waste Water Transport and Waste Water Treatment. Each area can be used individually or work together as a complete system. The stations can also be leveraged to do applied research like modeling and simulations.

“NEW Works curriculum was designed to quickly equip water management professionals with the skills to function at an advanced level in the water industry,” stated Shajan M. John, President of Mahattil International. John continues, “Our courses address the global shortage of water industry technicians and engineers.” Trainees are equipped with process control and automation field expertise to effectively manage a precious resource - water.

An open house featuring tours, demonstrations, and presentations will be held Monday, Feb. 10, 2014 at the NEW Works facility in the Global Water Center located at 247 Freshwater Way, Milwaukee, WI 53204. Festivities begin at 9:30 a.m. and continue throughout the day. A ribbon-cutting ceremony, presided over by Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. with the days’ events concluding with a reception at 5:30 p.m.

Electordialysis (ED) technology has application in the water, food, beverage and many industries. Prof. Dr. Johannes Fritsch, University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten, Germany is scheduled to speak on this topic at the Global Water Center in the morning. Cheese manufacturing companies in the region should find this presentation useful.

NEW Works is an entity of Mahattil International, a global consultancy dedicated to furthering the education and deployment of international business growth practices. NEW Works mission is to train professionals, accelerate technology transfer, and transform communities using appropriate technologies for water management. Both NEW Works and Mahattil International are located in the Global Water Center in Milwaukee, WI. For more information visit the website: http://www.mahattil.com/water.html or call (262) 671–4291.

For more information:
Shajan M. John
President NEW Works/Mahattil International Global Water Center
Suite 220, 247 West Freshwater Way Milwaukee, WI 53204
(262) 671–4291
water@mahatill.com

Click here for more information
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Globally Brainstorming Digitally Enhanced Agroecology Eco Tourism Badge Program

On Badges For Learning & Credentialing

http://nextcity.org/daily/entry/connected-learning-chicago-tests-digital-badges-to-track-education

http://www.2mbetterfutures.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Expanding-Workforce-and-Education-Opportunities-through-digital-badges.pdf

Advancing Global Ecological Collaborative Innovation Networks(COINs)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaborative_innovation_network

A Collaborative Innovation Network, or CoIN, is a social construct used to describe innovative teams[clarification needed]. It has been defined by the originator of the term, Peter Gloor (a Research Scientist at MIT Sloan’s Center for Collective Intelligence) as “a cyberteam of self-motivated people with a collective vision, enabled by the Web to collaborate in achieving a common goal by sharing ideas, information, and work.”

COINs feature internal transparency and direct communication. Members of a COIN collaborate and share knowledge directly with each other, rather than through hierarchies. They come together with a shared vision because they are intrinsically motivated to do so and seek to collaborate in some way to advance an idea.

The five essential elements of collaborative innovation networks (what Gloor calls their “genetic code”) are as follows:

  • Evolve from learning networks[clarification needed]
  • Feature sound ethical principles
  • Based on trust and self-organization
  • Make knowledge accessible to everyone
  • Operate in internal honesty and transparency

COINs rely on modern technology such as the Internet, e-mail, and other communications vehicles for information sharing. Creativity, collaboration, and communication are their hallmarks.[citation needed]

COINs existed well before modern communication technology enabled their creation and development. Peter Gloor and Scott Cooper, in their book, describe Benjamin Franklin’s “Junto” organization in Philadelphia as a COIN paradigm. Franklin brought together people with diverse backgrounds, from varying occupations, but of like mind to share knowledge and promulgate innovation.

Similar is the concept of the “Self-Organizing Innovation Network” which have been described by one author, Robert Rycroft of the Elliott School of International Affairs of George Washington University as follows:

“The most valuable and complex technologies are increasingly innovated by networks that self-organize. Networks are those linked organizations (e.g., firms, universities, government agencies) that create, acquire, and integrate diverse knowledge and skills required to innovate complex technologies (e.g., aircraft, telecommunications equipment). In other words, innovation networks are organized around constant learning. Self-organization refers to the capacity these networks have for combining and recombining these learned capabilities without centralized, detailed managerial guidance. The proliferation of self-organizing innovation networks may be linked to many factors, but a key one seems to be increasing globalization. Indeed, globalization and self-organizing networks may be coevolving. Changes in the organization of the innovation process appear to have facilitated the broadening geographical linkages of products, processes, and markets. At the same time, globalization seems to induce cooperation among innovative organizations.”

Police Community Peace Garden

Jesuit School Experiments

Last edited by Tyler Schuster. Based on work by James Godsil, Godsil and sam.  Page last modified on May 27, 2016

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