Main.MasksAmok History

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April 18, 2020, at 08:28 AM by Godsil -
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Perhaps your design brilliance can be harvested for this vision!

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The Halyard H600 wrap is two fused layers when it is taken off surgical instrument trays. The masks are made by sewing two unfused layers (one blue and one white sheet) together.

Supplies

  • Medical grade fabric (Halyard H600) supplied by hospital
  • One piece of 16-gauge wire (not aluminum as it is too soft)
  • 100% Acrylic yarn, size medium # 4 (used for ties)
  • Cutting mat, ruler, rotary cutter if available
  • Sewing machine, thread, scissors, sewing clips/paperclips, seam ripper (NOTE: please use pins sparingly to avoid holes)
  • Jewelry pliers or needle nose pliers and wire cutters

Directions

  • Cut two pieces of the Halyard fabric 7” × 8” (mask body) and two pieces 1” × 36” (tie/binding fabric). The blue side will be the outer side of the mask and the white side the inside of the mask. The 7″ sides will be the width across the top and the bottom of the mask. The 8-inch sides will be pleated. Three pleats will make the final mask 4″ deep.

  • Layer the 2 pieces of 7″ x 8″ fabric on top of each other. Sew a 1/4″ inch seam on the 7″ sides.

  • Turn the mask right side out. Finger press and clip, topstitch 1/4″ from both edges on the sides you just clipped.

  • For the nose piece, cut the wire into a 6” piece. Make a small loop on each end of the wire and press flat. See image 1. The loops should be facing the same way. Insert the prepared wire into the 1/4″ seam on one of the sides you top stitched. Center the wire. This is now the TOP of the mask.

  • Mark 2″ down from the TOP edge of the mask on both sides. Make three accordion-style pleats along the 8″ side as follows: Make the 3 half-inch pleats starting at the 2″ mark and clip each pleat. Space the pleats one after the other and clip them to make the mask 4″ wide. Adjust the pleats accordingly. The pleats do not have to be perfect as long as the mask is 4 inches wide. This is VERY important because if the mask is too short, it won’t go under the chin in some cases, and if the mask is too long, it could leave too much of a gap on the side of the face. Do not change the number of pleats as the bottom pleat is especially important to the curvature of the mask under the chin. See image 2.

  • Sew the pleats down by sewing 1/4″ seam. Repeat on the other side. When finished, the pleats will all be going down.

  • Cut two pieces of yarn 36” long. Mark the center of the yarn and clip to the center of the mask where the pleats are. Mark the center of the 36” strip and place under the edge of the mask where the yarn is. You want it halfway under the edge. Fold the side of the fabric strip over the top and clip in place (this is the “binding”). Start sewing where the pleats are. As you sew you need to scoot the yarn into the fold of the tie/binding fabric. Use a 3/8” seam and stitch down the edge of the mask. Keep folding the fabric in half lengthwise and stitch all the way to the end. Flip it over and sew the 3/8” seam all the way to the other end of the strip. To reinforce, sew a second line of stitching on both sides of the mask where the pleats are. Repeat on the other side. Note: the medical fabric does not fray so a single fold is sufficient. See image 3.

Where can I find details to make these masks?

We keep the most up-to-date information regarding our mask initiative on the department of anesthesiology’s website. If you have questions regarding materials, patterns or mask sterilization, please visit this site to find your answer in the FAQs, Mask DOs and DON’Ts and Mask TIPS and TRICKS.

From a note I sent to Marco Camacho, founder of MilwaukeeBlest, which is making the masks I purchased ($1,000 worth at $5 each).

Dear Marco,

My family was very happy to hear the news and see the images of the masks I bought from your team at MilwaukeeBlest and will be shipped sometime this week. A nurse friend connected me with a University of Florida department of anesthesiology has developed 2 prototypes for masks that can be produced in large quantities using materials already found in hospitals and medical facilities.

Halyard H600 fabric that is typically used to wrap surgical instrument trays in medical settings

If You Are “Partner” Have Time To Harvest U of Florida Mask Innovation

https://anest.ufl.edu/clinical-divisions/mask-alternative/?fbclid=IwAR3bcDq8G3d5JUdYBBl8jW6ws7rWYseXk3Ml9uAAVZ9sreTLR2S0VjgqnS0

We are using Halyard H600 fabric that is typically used to wrap surgical instrument trays in medical settings. If you are seeking this material, you can contact a local medical facility to ask about availability.

The Halyard H600 wrap is two fused layers when it is taken off surgical instrument trays. The masks are made by sewing two unfused layers (one blue and one white sheet) together.

Why not?

Blessings,

Godsil

April 17, 2020, at 04:48 PM by James Godsil -
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(:cell width=50%:)

Masks Amok!

Made In Milwaukee Cottage Industry Mask Mobilization Experiment

Perhaps your design brilliance can be harvested for this vision!

I have harvested the collective wisdom of my facebook friends and identified a Latino tailor with time spent at School of Art Institute and Milwaukee H.S. of the Arts, a good and decent salt of the earth artist/ecopreneur, who has a team at his recently purchased 2926 W. Forest Home Ave. building, making hundreds of masks of quality adequate for the moment(but in great need of design/production elevation.

I have 2 masks like those pictured for you and yours…more if you wish to buy some from him.

Milwaukee Network To Build Upon Our 1940s Arsenal of Democracy Heritage

I am imagining pulling together linked networks of mask innovators for upgrading safety design, but also designs to inspire our citizens to buy, wear, and properly use.

Partnering With University of Florida Health’s department of anesthesiology?

The University of Florida Health’s department of anesthesiology has developed 2 prototypes for masks that can be produced in large quantities using materials already found in hospitals and medical facilities.

Halyard H600 fabric that is typically used to wrap surgical instrument trays in medical settings

I hope one of my fb friends will make some calls to local medical facility to ask about availability.

The Halyard H600 wrap is two fused layers when it is taken off surgical instrument trays. The masks are made by sewing two unfused layers (one blue and one white sheet) together.

Supplies

  • Medical grade fabric (Halyard H600) supplied by hospital
  • One piece of 16-gauge wire (not aluminum as it is too soft)
  • 100% Acrylic yarn, size medium # 4 (used for ties)
  • Cutting mat, ruler, rotary cutter if available
  • Sewing machine, thread, scissors, sewing clips/paperclips, seam ripper (NOTE: please use pins sparingly to avoid holes)
  • Jewelry pliers or needle nose pliers and wire cutters

Directions

  • Cut two pieces of the Halyard fabric 7” × 8” (mask body) and two pieces 1” × 36” (tie/binding fabric). The blue side will be the outer side of the mask and the white side the inside of the mask. The 7″ sides will be the width across the top and the bottom of the mask. The 8-inch sides will be pleated. Three pleats will make the final mask 4″ deep.

  • Layer the 2 pieces of 7″ x 8″ fabric on top of each other. Sew a 1/4″ inch seam on the 7″ sides.

  • Turn the mask right side out. Finger press and clip, topstitch 1/4″ from both edges on the sides you just clipped.

  • For the nose piece, cut the wire into a 6” piece. Make a small loop on each end of the wire and press flat. See image 1. The loops should be facing the same way. Insert the prepared wire into the 1/4″ seam on one of the sides you top stitched. Center the wire. This is now the TOP of the mask.

  • Mark 2″ down from the TOP edge of the mask on both sides. Make three accordion-style pleats along the 8″ side as follows: Make the 3 half-inch pleats starting at the 2″ mark and clip each pleat. Space the pleats one after the other and clip them to make the mask 4″ wide. Adjust the pleats accordingly. The pleats do not have to be perfect as long as the mask is 4 inches wide. This is VERY important because if the mask is too short, it won’t go under the chin in some cases, and if the mask is too long, it could leave too much of a gap on the side of the face. Do not change the number of pleats as the bottom pleat is especially important to the curvature of the mask under the chin. See image 2.

  • Sew the pleats down by sewing 1/4″ seam. Repeat on the other side. When finished, the pleats will all be going down.

  • Cut two pieces of yarn 36” long. Mark the center of the yarn and clip to the center of the mask where the pleats are. Mark the center of the 36” strip and place under the edge of the mask where the yarn is. You want it halfway under the edge. Fold the side of the fabric strip over the top and clip in place (this is the “binding”). Start sewing where the pleats are. As you sew you need to scoot the yarn into the fold of the tie/binding fabric. Use a 3/8” seam and stitch down the edge of the mask. Keep folding the fabric in half lengthwise and stitch all the way to the end. Flip it over and sew the 3/8” seam all the way to the other end of the strip. To reinforce, sew a second line of stitching on both sides of the mask where the pleats are. Repeat on the other side. Note: the medical fabric does not fray so a single fold is sufficient. See image 3.

Where can I find details to make these masks?

We keep the most up-to-date information regarding our mask initiative on the department of anesthesiology’s website. If you have questions regarding materials, patterns or mask sterilization, please visit this site to find your answer in the FAQs, Mask DOs and DON’Ts and Mask TIPS and TRICKS.

From a note I sent to Marco Camacho, founder of MilwaukeeBlest, which is making the masks I purchased ($1,000 worth at $5 each).

Dear Marco,

My family was very happy to hear the news and see the images of the masks I bought from your team at MilwaukeeBlest and will be shipped sometime this week. A nurse friend connected me with a University of Florida department of anesthesiology has developed 2 prototypes for masks that can be produced in large quantities using materials already found in hospitals and medical facilities.

Halyard H600 fabric that is typically used to wrap surgical instrument trays in medical settings

If You Are “Partner” Have Time To Harvest U of Florida Mask Innovation

https://anest.ufl.edu/clinical-divisions/mask-alternative/?fbclid=IwAR3bcDq8G3d5JUdYBBl8jW6ws7rWYseXk3Ml9uAAVZ9sreTLR2S0VjgqnS0

We are using Halyard H600 fabric that is typically used to wrap surgical instrument trays in medical settings. If you are seeking this material, you can contact a local medical facility to ask about availability.

The Halyard H600 wrap is two fused layers when it is taken off surgical instrument trays. The masks are made by sewing two unfused layers (one blue and one white sheet) together.

Why not?

Blessings,

Godsil

Last edited by Godsil. Based on work by James Godsil.  Page last modified on April 18, 2020, at 08:28 AM

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