On this page…

  1. What Makes an “Organic” Fish? What Makes an “Organic” Deer?
  2. Top Australian Aquaponics Mon to USA
  3. Thoroughly Researched Cost Benefit Analysis of Backyard Aquaponics
  4. Inspiring E-mails to Sweet Water
  5. Replicating Sweet Waters
  6. Start an Aquaponics Meet Up Group <New>
  7. Very Helpful Piece re Aquaponics School in Florida <New>
  8. SweetWater Slideshow!
  9. Wisconsin Foodie CBS TV Show on Sweet Water Organics
  10. Outpost Natural Foods You Tube Clip on Sweet Water
  11. Permaculturist Rob Frost’s Blog Report on Sweet Water
  12. Plans for Small Aquaculture System in Your Basement!
  13. Lots of Information About Large Scale Composting
  14. Young Yellow Perch Like Rocky Bottoms!
  15. International On Line Learning at Aquaponics Community Center of England
    1. 15.1  India Nepal Aquaponics Project Partnership Possibilities With Aquaponics Community Center
  16. MIT Grass Roots Articulations
    1. 16.1  Toward Contextually Appropriate Aquaculture Systems Development
  17. This Wednesday Sept. 16 Sweet Water Gathering Cancelled
    1. 17.1  Sweet Water Will Be Deeply Focused on Birthing 15,000 Tiny Tilapia to Our Systems
  18. Afghanistan Aquaculture Project
    1. 18.1  Pump Problem
    2. 18.2  Pump “Solutions” Suggested
    3. 18.3  Charlie Price E-Mail to Matt: 7/22/09;8/01/09/ 8/15/09
    4. 18.4  August 1, 2009
    5. 18.5  August 15, 2009
    6. 18.6  September 8th
    7. 18.7  September 13th
  19. Comfoods Workers Rock!
  20. Sweet Water Agrarian Guild School(AGS)Launched
    1. 20.1  Sweet Water AGS Current Projects
  21. Sweet Water News for Clients, Partners, and Investors
    1. 21.1  Sweet Water Soap Box Orator Try Outs
    2. 21.2  Volunteering at Sweet Water
    3. 21.3  Bring Your Students and Elders to Milwaukee For Sweet Water Tour!
    4. 21.4  Sweet Water Student Tours, $80 Minimum, Up to 40 Students
    5. 21.5  Become a Sweet Water Fish Monger
    6. 21.6  Sweet Water Fall Compost Sale for Spring Crop
    7. 21.7  Become a $5 Sweet Water Investor
    8. 21.8  Suggested Reading for Sweet Water Partners and Investors
  22. A Four Season Hoop House for Each and Every Fire House!
    1. 22.1  Ripe Red Cherry Tomatoes for Valiant Fire Fighters
    2. 22.2  And Firefighters Teach Our Children
  23. David Swanson’s Braise Culinary School First Sweet Water Basil Customer
  24. Fish Farm Archives

What Makes an “Organic” Fish? What Makes an “Organic” Deer?

http://www.accidentalhedonist.com/index.php?title=what_makes_an_organic_fish&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1

Top Australian Aquaponics Mon to USA

Post : Murray Hallam to Teach Aquaponics in Colorado!
URL : http://aquaponicgardening.wordpress.com/2010/07/05/murray-hallam-to-teach-aquaponics-in-colorado/
Posted : July 5, 2010 at 5:14 pm
Author : slywoman
Tags : aquaponic, aquaponics, australia, australian, backyard
aquaponics, denver botanic gardens, murray hallam, video
Categories : Aquaponic Inspirations, The Aquaponic Life, The Aquaponic Source

I adore Murray Hallam. His charming demeanor on his videos reminds me
of my father with an Australian accent. I also greatly respect the
work he has done in home aquaponics in Australia. He is one of two
men who have largely been responsible for the boom in the market down
there. We tend to agree about just about everything when it

comes to media based aquaponic gardening. I recently told him that I
think our only point of departure is that I’m a very big fan of
expanded clay pebbles (Hydroton
(http://theaquaponicsource.com/proddetail.php?prod=CWHHF001)) as a
growing media because it is lightweight and is very easy on my hands.
Murray feels that those concerns are mainly for women (those Aussies
are just tougher than we are). A very minor philosophical departure
indeed! His systems are well thought out and well made. His email
newsletters are informative and amusing. His videos
(http://theaquaponicsource.com/proddetail.php?prod=EVAPA003&cat=36)
are an outstanding blend of garden-geek dramatic theater and practical
how-to.

So you can imagine how excited I was when Murray approached me earlier
this year about not only becoming a reseller of his videos
(http://theaquaponicsource.com/proddetail.php?prod=EVAPA003&cat=36) in
the U.S. but also sponsoring one of two stops in the U.S. for his
first ever tour here. What an incredible opportunity to get to spend
time learning directly from the master himself!

My partner in the event is the Denver Botanic Gardens, and the
workshop will be from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Sunday, September 19th at
the Denver Botanic Gardens. Space is very limited (we have a smaller
room than I originally hoped for) so I recommend signing up early.
Click here for more information.
(http://theaquaponicsource.com/events.php)

Also, if you are interested in gathering with some fellow aquapons in
Boulder the day before (Saturday) I’m considering hosting a tour of
several aquaponics setups around this area – just let me know by
commenting on this post so I can keep you in the planning loop.

Hope to see you all there!

Add a comment to this post:
http://aquaponicgardening.wordpress.com/2010/07/05/murray-hallam-to-teach-aquaponics-in-colorado/#respond

Thoroughly Researched Cost Benefit Analysis of Backyard Aquaponics

http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/Travis/CostBenefitAnalysisofAquaponicSystems.pdf

Inspiring E-mails to Sweet Water

From Parris Adams:

Recently I learned about Sweet Water, and I just have to say I have great admiration for your efforts.

I live in Milwaukee, I drive past abandon buildings, houses, and lots every day. I have always seen them as oppurtunties to bring agriculture near people to reduce the need to transport goods. Embracing the ideas of green always puts a smile on my face.

Something I learned while browsing your site that you have a giant compost heap.
I live near a grocery store that throws out tons of produce every week. It’s quite sad when you consider the reasons behind it, but to think that you could take all this nutrient rich “trash” from grocery stores and resturants around the city and add it to a system that promotes the cycling of human waste. It amazes me, and that’s why I thank you. I hope to see this in cities and nations around the world to reduce our corbon foot print and to feed people. Thank YOU all!

Replicating Sweet Waters

We have been committed from the get to to inspiring people to
consider crafting Sweet Waters beyond Milwaukee.

How or when that will occur depends upon a myriad of developments, foremost
the success we have in “proof of concept” and the energy and resources partners
in new Sweet Waters bring to the project.

I suspect there are a number of people in your community who constitute the
human capital required for a Sweet Water in your building. Consider approaching some of the leaders of the “grow local” enterprises, academics and policy makers supportive of this cause, people from outside your might recruit to work with you. Talk your idea up at local farmers markets, forums, opinion columns, on and on.

If you can pull together a team of artisans, artists, cultivators, scientists, and mechanically gifted people…

We are setting up a Foundation aimed at offering some of the basic “software” required to launch and sustain new Sweet Waters. We will have workshops on site as well as on-line courses.

We will also be considering “joint ventures by contract” and consulting services sometime during 2011.

In the meantime, I suggest you google “aquaponics” and begin reading what the literature has to offer. Or, find a partner who will do so.

I am happy to be part of a correspondence with you and your team over the years.

Start an Aquaponics Meet Up Group <New>

http://aquaponics.meetup.com/all/
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Very Helpful Piece re Aquaponics School in Florida <New>

Dade City man hopes to help cure world hunger with aquaponics

By Leonora LaPeter Anton, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Sunday, March 7, 2010

DADE CITY

At a school in the woods, an IT consultant from London is trying to learn how to raise fish and vegetables together so he can teach it to hungry Nigerians.

An organic farmer from Melbourne Beach wants to master this green fish farming to bring it to a charter school in Palm Bay. And a pair of women from Brooksville are learning so they can start their own business.

At the center of all these divergent dreams is Hans Geissler, a former plumber and catamaran builder who believes that his self-contained system of gardening and fishing — called aquaponics — can help solve world hunger.

He founded the 10-acre Morning Star Fishermen school, where you can learn everything from building your own backyard aquaponics system to starting a commercial operation in a Third World country.

“Why do I do it?” says Geissler, 68, an expressive man with large hands and a German accent. “Because I believe in being green and growing our own food and not depending on everyone else.”

Click here for the rest and a video
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SweetWater Slideshow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8m0Z92oR1Y

Wisconsin Foodie CBS TV Show on Sweet Water Organics

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSyx0noGpeM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHqyJdXY6Sk&feature=email

Outpost Natural Foods You Tube Clip on Sweet Water

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBx_LWRd_Qg

Permaculturist Rob Frost’s Blog Report on Sweet Water

http://onestraw.wordpress.com/2009/12/11/4-season-farming-winter-vermicomposting/

Plans for Small Aquaculture System in Your Basement!

Cliff,

Godsil forwarded your email about small system aquaculture. As it happens, I have such a system in my basement. I have two 55 gallon barrels, one a tank the other a biofilter. In the culture tank there are 15 yellow perch which are now roughly 1/3 pound each. The plans for this system were obtained from Southern Regional Aquaculture Center. Just google “SRAC 4501″ and the plans should come up as a choice.

I am happy with the way the system works and would recommend it. I got the barrels from Craigs list in Milwaukee by putting an ad under free stuff. Let me know how things work out.

Jon Bales
www.urbanaquaculturecenter.com

Lots of Information About Large Scale Composting

First of all, you may want to contact your local Extension agent. The Extension service acts to link information from the state land-grant university to citizens. Each county has an Extension agent that acts as an employee of the university system. In your area, the University of Wsiconsin Extension office in Milwaukee can be contacted at: http://milwaukee.uwex.edu/

In addition, the University of Wisconsin Extension has a Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center. You can find them on the web at: www4.uwm.edu/shwec/. To search this site, click on publications, and search “composting” for publications and surveys. The SHWEC has a staff person in the Milwaukee area named Steve Brachman. You can access his contact information at: www4.uwm.edu/shwec/faculty/info.cfm?id=brachman.

In addition to these contacts, my colleagues referenced the following websites and contacts as places for helpful information on setting up an urban compost system.

http://www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/garbage/diningwaste.cfm
http://compost.css.cornell.edu/Factsheets/FS1.html
http://www.middlebury.edu/administration/enviro/initiatives/food/composting.htm
http://www.ohio.edu/sustainability/index.html
http://www.ohio.edu/sustainability/Compost.htm

Contacts for Composting

Office Manager for Cornell Dining
2117 North Balch Hall
607–255–5952
Fax: 607–255–2937
dhl34@cornell.edu

Baker University Center, Ohio University
One Park Place, Athens, OH 45701
Tel: 740.593.4020 | Fax: 740.593.0223
Email: baker.center@ohio.edu

Dining Services
1 Riverside Drive
Athens, Ohio 45701

Tel: 740.593.2970
Email: dining@ohio.edu

www.perdue.edu/UNS/paks/scipak.table.html
www.okshops.com/composter/
www.fortlewis.edu/acad-aff/art-sci/agri/perm_html
www.darien.lib.ct.us/environmental/compostlesson
www.colostate.edu/Depts/SoilCrop/extension/Soils/Docs/ManuerMgmt
www.horizon.nmsu.edu
www.cahe.wsu.edu/~wwmg/stewardship/compost/
www.bedminster.com/basic/processinfo
www.agctr.lsu.edu/wwac/compost/school.html
www.cmil.unex.Berkeley.edu/medial/sales/06science/scimain4.html
www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/
www.agrss.sherman.hawaii.edu
www.elpaso.tamu.edu

I hope this information is helpful and that we can be of service to you again in the future. For more information on sustainable agriculture, please contact NCAT through the ATTRA project at our toll-free number, 1–800–346–9140. Please note that all of our publications and additional resources are available on our Web site at www.attra.ncat.org.

Sincerely,

Susan Tallman

Agronomy and Crop Systems Specialist

NCAT/ATTRA

ATTRA is the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service

The ATTRA Project is operated by the National Center for Appropriate Technology under a grant from the Rural Business-Cooperative Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. These organizations do not recommend or endorse products, companies, or individuals.
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Young Yellow Perch Like Rocky Bottoms!

Ann Arbor, Mich. — When Lake Michigan yellow perch and alewife are looking for their first home, they apparently prefer floors made of rock rather than sand.

In the past, researchers have tended to sample for young fish in areas where there is lots of sand simply because these areas are more easily sampled. However, sampling on sand has yielded very few young yellow perch, and this was cause for concern.

“Yellow perch have been in a serious decline in Lake Michigan for about fifteen years”, says John Janssen, a Senior Scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. “When fish populations get into trouble, it’s often the case that the trouble affects the youngest individuals. We need to know where these young fish live and how they get there.”

The young fish emerge from eggs and drift around for at least six weeks before settling down. They may have drifted a hundred miles, but they seem to wait until they are above rocky substrates before they actively choose to stay around. Indeed Janssen and Michelle Luebke have, at times, collected more young yellow perch in one sample over rocky substrate than the combined annual total for all the Lake Michigan biologists that sample sandy areas! Young yellow perch, 2–3 inches long, were about four times as abundant on rocky substrate compared to sandy substrate, and their diet was mainly small invertebrates that live among the rocks.

Original Publication Information
Results of this study, “Preference for rocky habitat by age-0 yellow perch and alewives,” are reported by John Janssen and Michelle Luebke in the latest issue (Volume 30, No 1, pp. 93–99) of the Journal of Great Lakes Research, published by the International Association for Great Lakes Research, 2004.

Contacts
For more information about the study, contact John Janssen, Great Lakes WATER Institute, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53204, jjanssen@uwm.edu, 414–382–1733.

For information about the Journal of Great Lakes Research, contact Marlene Evans, Editor, National Water Research Institute, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 3H5, Canada; marlene.evans@ec.gc.ca; (306) 975–5310.
Click here for original
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International On Line Learning at Aquaponics Community Center of England

Hi everyone,

Just really to continue on from James Godsil’s email..

Aquaponics UK, in cooperation with the Institute if Aquaculture at the University of Stirling, Queen Mary College London and the University of York, we are looking at setting up an “Aquaponics community center”. A virtual online based resource providing distance learning materials, support and the provision of systems (linked by computer/webcam and icon driven data base) to schools and educational institutions across the world (provisional partners already established in USA, UK, Ukraine, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Kenya, Japan and China).

At the institute of aquaculture and more specifically the systems research group, we have been developing a PG/MSc distance learning course in Aquatic resource development and its now in its 3rd year.

http://www.aqua.stir.ac.uk/training/taught-postgraduate/aquatic-resources.php

Whilst the course in currently only available to students in Bangladesh, we are planning to expand this and to provide an aquaponic specific courses through the above mentioned partnerships.

We would be very interesting in collaborating with MIT and any other organisations to make this a reality. We really do need to pool resources, research and expertise to make this work.

We are currently working on a variety of projects from Kenya, Uganda, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Europe and extensively in the UK, we have expanding resources and are very keen to help coordinate the development of educational resources and research relating to aquaponics.

Please get in touch if you would like to contribute to the proposed ‘Aquaponics Community Center’.

We’re currently in the process of securing funding, so ideas and collaborations are valued.

Best wishes,

Charlie
Charlie Price - Project Manager
apuklogo small
charlie@aquaponics.org.uk
www.aquaponics.org.uk
mob: 07545 817206

India Nepal Aquaponics Project Partnership Possibilities With Aquaponics Community Center

Charlie - you and I have already had some correspondence about my upcoming work in India. This e-mail piques my interest because I think the Aquaponics Community Center concept brings up a very good opportunity for collaboration, research and effecting real change throughout the world. In India and Nepal, we hope, in the next few years, to be developing aquaponics systems in dozens and eventually hundreds of villages. The possibilities for impactful research [that which actually directly effects the livelihood and well-being of people in need] are bountiful. Among general, cross-disciplinary areas of potential research [off the top of my head] are studies on the rural economic/livelihoods impact of aquaponics development; micronutrient deficiency targeting among the most marginalized (pregnant women; children under five; the elderly; etc.); social/anthropological critiques of food insecurity; marketing and value-chain development in rural village communities involved in fisheries cooperatives; the effects of co-habitation between certain varieties of shrimp and various fish species in semi-arid climates, and on and on. Within the more narrow field of Aquaponics and Aquaculture proper, there would be an infinite field of potential research.
All of this is to say, I would like to contribute to and and be a part of any such endeavor. Our project would undoubtedly benefit from it.
You mention at the end of your memo that ‘ideas and collaboration’ are valued. We’d love to be a part of a ‘global learning laboratory’ for an Aquaponics Community Center. Providing field-work opportunities for researchers while benefitting directly from said research.
It’s a great idea and I look forward to seeing it move forward!

Tom

Tom Knoll
Founder/Director
Pathways To Empowerment
www.pathwaystoempowerment.org
tom@pathwaystoempowerment.org
mu81169@hotmail.com

Hello Charlie,

I know that you are busy, but I wanted to get in touch with you to let you know how things are moving along here. I spent several days in the field this past week looking at prospective sites to pilot the aquaponics system. In about 10 villages, I talked to farmers, women’s groups, youth groups and elders about the system to gauge their reaction, thoughts and interest. The response was nothing short of overwhelming. This is a drought-prone, rain-fed region that is increasingly faced with erratic rainfall due to climate change, so any adaptive measure that can help alleviate food dependence on the whims of increasingly capricious rains are sorely needed and would lend hope to and bolster the resilience of the people in this region.

With regard to the climatic changes as they relate to food security and human resilience, I should note that this project is part of a micro-farming component that falls under the purview of a larger initiative the Watershed Organization Trust is undertaking to promote climate change adaptation strategies among the communities they work with. [I’ve attached the draft concept paper for that project for you to peruse.]

The pilot project will establish productive multi-tiered aquaponics systems in 5 diverse settings. Two will be located at training centers and will be developed as training/learning models. The three remaining sites will be in different villages, with diverse oversight structures [a women’s self help group, a school youth group, and an individual farmer] external inputs and constraints [one has ready access to fairly advanced vermi-composting, one will use a pond, one will strictly be looking at this from a small business perspective, etc.].

The aims of the project include: i) contribute to food and nutritional security; ii) demonstrate the ability for small farmers to produce nutritious food with limited water input independent from rain; iii) demonstrate potential for alternative livelihood creation.

Additionally, training will be provided on management of the system to the identified community members, school students and teachers, and women’s Self Help Groups [SHG]. The project will serve as a demonstration to test the practical applicability, scope, economics, ecology and politics of aquaponics as these relate to villagers and small farmers.

Based upon all of their knowledge and work, the WOTR administration is committed, in the post-pilot phase, to scaling up this project to perhaps 3 dozen sites and possibly more.

With regard to our past discussions, specifically, you had mentioned a number of things including the following:

“…the level of support and resources you would require from our end, there are lots of options ranging from part time type inputs, up to more involved inputs from a variety of people ranging from PhD students, myself and the growing team here at Aquaponics UK and the Institute as whole, it’s all really going to depend on availability of resources and the scope of our collective activities.” Based upon my description of the project, I’d be interested in knowing your thoughts about support and resources. Specifically, I’m wondering about the possibility of someone from your group coming here for a couple of weeks in, say, March to help oversee the initial development of the systems and would be interested in knowing your estimates about costs for that. Then, between the three organizations - WOTR, Aquaponics UK, Pathways To Empowerment - we could work to find the funding. I think that would be a very good idea, I would certainly be very keen indeed to come out in March or there abouts, failing that Becky or someone with equivalent expertise would definitely be able to come out, so that is a definite possibility…. In terms of costs, we would require flights to be paid for and a modest stipend to cover expenses, on that subject I am adamant that we provide value for money and don’t want be a drain on resources (quite the opposite) so at this early stage I would be happy to leave the stipend side of things to your discretion. Generally we change a subsidised consultancy rate of £148, which covers our university related overheads and salary, however this is the start of the project so we’re very happy to be flexible on this in order to get the ball rolling.

“…grant proposal applications…”

We will have a look at the document you attached and get back to you later today/tomorrow at the latest.

“…training curriculum we can be of lots of assistance there with expertise in participatory research techniques such as PRA, PCA, RRA, and household surveys, we have also in the past developed pictorial multilingual guides to aquaculture and IPM training, so the same could easily be replicated for aquaponics…” [What about Hindi or Marathi? If not, we can translate here.]

I will speak to some people, and get back to you on this no point in doing it if we dont have to, but my honest answer is that I’m not entirely sure..

You said your first step would be: “…allocating inventories and costings…using locally sourced price data…” We could use help with this. Perfect, certainly an initial trip out to the project sites would help establish what would be most suitable, but I will send you over some pics of the systems we’ve been developing here, (in a week or two once all completed)

Beyond all this, your thoughts and comments would be greatly appreciated. I hope you are well and will look forward to hearing back from you soon!

Much thanks, as always,

Tom

MIT Grass Roots Articulations

Toward Contextually Appropriate Aquaculture Systems Development

I am told that MIT is pioneering on-line learning.
I would imagine other Universities are doing the same.

Would it not be a good thing to brainstorm the development
of on-line courses through MIT and other universities
eyes fixed on the prize of developing…

Contextually appropriate aquaculture systems

To provide fish based protein in, for starters,
Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans, and the Congo.

Our waterways can be renewed.
Our charismatic species like bonobos, elephants, giraffes
Need not be slaughtered and made extinct.
We can improve our collaborations with nature’s fertility cycles
With imaginative focus on aquaculture’s possibilites.

Milwaukee Resources for Collaborations with On-Line University Programs Partout!

  • Will Allen’s From the Ground Up Aquaculture Workshops,
  • The Milwaukee Zoological Society’s Congo Biodiversity and Bonobo Survival Initiatives,
  • Wisconsin’s New Milwaukee Based School of Fresh Water Sciences Ph.D. program

Please drop a line if this concept merits your attention.

Grateful,

James J. Godsil
Sweet Water Organics Fish Vegetable Farm

This Wednesday Sept. 16 Sweet Water Gathering Cancelled

Sweet Water Will Be Deeply Focused on Birthing 15,000 Tiny Tilapia to Our Systems

Sweet Water will be like a birthing room, and workers must be completely focused on this dramatic, delicate moment.

Afghanistan Aquaculture Project

Here is some correspondence initiated by Marine Sgt Matthew Holzmann, stationed in Afghanistan, hoping to introduce aquaponics for self reliance and community building.

Pump Problem

I’m in Afghanistan now, as part of Operation Khanjar, which has been making the news quite a bit lately. I would like to bring Will’s vision to the people of Nawa. However, I have trouble getting materials. If Will can devise ‘re-use’ methods for me to implement with limited materials, then I will gladly get the ball rolling here.

My biggest problem is getting a pump to move water from tank to bed. Many of the folks here have generators, so power shouldn’t be much of a problem. However, they ALL use 220 power, with plugs that we don’t see in the US. They use the same plug here that the Brits use, and the rest of the Arab nations use. So, if you can get me the information to get started, then I can do whatever I can to get a system going here.

We will be working out of an old school, and should be able to get a smallish system working there. If Will plans on coming to Afghanistan, have him try to get a trip to see 1st BN, 5th MAR, under 2nd MEB, working with the NATO ISAF group out of Camp Leatherneck/Camp Bastion. Again, we are working out of Nawa. The locals would most likely be using some variety of catfish for their aquaculture component. Feel free to pass my email on to Will; I’d love to be a part of his vision.

Best wishes,

Sgt Matthew Holzmann, Data Supervisor
1st BN, 5th MAR, H&S Co, Comm Plt, Data
DSN: 318.359.5100
EMAIL: matthew.holzmann@afg.usmc.mil

Pump “Solutions” Suggested

Howard Lewis

“Affordable?” Holy Cow! Technology doesn’t come cheap. Is the Pentagon footing the bill or the subsistence farmers who are already hard-pressed to survive?

The second issue is maintenance and repair. When my father-in-law designed airport terminals in Ethiopia, he specified thatched roofs. Thatch was the perfect technology; affordable, maintainable, and replaceable at the end of their life-cycle. When we designed a school campus in India we used building systems and materials that could be produced by the students, who were able to build and expand their own school buildings then take their knowledge and skills back to their villages after graduation.

Think cheap, local, replicate-able, simple. How about hand pumps or foot pumps?

Mention these things to Sgt. Holzman. Also suggest he contact Mother Earth News. Its readers (Hippies in the Woods) have likely figured out how to move water in a thousand innovative ways.

Ho

Charlie Price

Dear Matthew

As you can see from below your email reached far and wide. I work at The Institute of Aquaculture at Stirling University and run a not for profit organisation called Aquaponics UK.

Anyway to cut a long story short I too have been inflicted with the Aquaponics bug and am working with a wide range of projects both in the UK and internationally to establish aquaponics systems both for education, rehabilitation and food production. Around a year ago we were actually in talks with some delegates from Afghanistan set up through the British Council who expressed an interest in aquaculture and aquaponics and their suitability due to water scarcity and high potential productivity. (I will chase things up and keep you informed)

In short, I think what your trying to do is fantastic and exactly the kind of initiatives that we need to support. I am extremely keen to help with in any way I can. I have played with various low tech aquaponics systems with a view to their adoption into the developing world as both temporary and semi permanent solutions to food production and enhanced nutrition, but I do agree that pumping is an issue for situations such as yours where services are not readily available and even generators have often untenable.

One method that I would suggest and one that I am exploring with a “scrap-yard engineering wizard” friend of mine is the use of a bicycle to pump sufficient water into a header tank to then operate either flood and drain cycles or through grow beds / nft. This would then mean a predetermined amount of cycling time to provide 12 or 24 hour flow rates (and multiples of two fish tanks on the low and higher levels (I can give you more details if interested)

We’ve recently been given some product development and research and development money from a commercial sponsor “Hydrogarden” and I’m sure this is exactly the kind of project they would be interested in supporting, so if you like, I can get someone to looking into the solar pump situation for you. Plus we’re working with some quite high profile projects in the UK, Eden, CAT, ABLE as well as commercial growers and individual schools and as a result receiving some wide reaching interest from Princess Anne to a recent BBC documentary to be aired shortly. So hopefully we can provide some support in terms of technical expertise but also help to generate publicity for what your trying to do, if required.

It would be good to know more about what sort of aquaponics configuration you had in mind and what species of fish and plants etc. Perhaps when you get time you could give me some more details and we can take it from there..

Best wishes and keep up the good work, if you want any free samples to play about with and experiment over there please let me know and I’ll get them sourced and sent out.

Best wishes

Charlie

Charlie Price - Project Manager
Aquaponics UK
University of Stirling
www.aquaponics.org.uk
Mob: 07545 817206

Hi Matthew,

Thanks again for your email, I think our shared enthusiasm is going to drive this forwards, like you said let’s keep up momentum.

I’ve provisionally contacted Hydrogarden and got the MD’s go ahead, also just to say regarding the eventual goal of a learning lab for the school, we’ve developed some really nice interactive display systems and are at the moment looking at incorporating wormeries and insect towers to demonstrate a whole ecosystem… so there is loads we can help/give and assist with there.

I was very close to going into the military/RAF myself as at 16 was awarded an RAF flying scholarship…but then whilst travelling in Africa and Asia before and during my first degree I realised who I was and what I wanted to do, then 10 years of university and three degrees later I’m getting to the stage where I can actually give something back. So I am extremely keen to help make this work and be of any and every help that I can.

I’ll email you again when back from Norway, but so long as you or any of your counterparts are keen, we’re here to help and support.

Best wishes

Charlie

Travis W. Hughey

Hey Matt,

Sounds like a challenging area to work in. I love it!! Wish I could be there. I have been hoping someone would take this technology to Afghanistan for quite some time now but had noone to talk to about it. I have a couple of comments and some questions for you.

One of the easiest aquaponic systems out there is a system that operates off a hand pump and the owner has to go out every hour or so and flood the growbeds manually, allow the water to sit there for 15 minutes or so and open a drain that would allow the growbed to slowly drain back into the fish pond. While not automated it can work and if there is nothing else to do a kid could keep the system going. A basic pitcher pump would work out just fine for it. Growbeds and fish tanks could be made from almost any liner (I use discarded billboard signs) as well as cement which is appropriate for most areas. Plumbing would be minimal and could be cast into the cement to reduce theft issues. I am concerned if it is too technological looking even the Taliban may see it as some connection to the west and immediately destroy it.

Are solar conditions right for solar power there? What about wind? Also, what would you estimate a reasonable cost for a complete turnkey system that could be set in place and literally be running in a few hours? I have an idea for something like this here and could easily put something together to test. I would need to know cost parameters though to help with design. The barrel-ponics concept can be made to run on very low power requirements. For instance I have a system that occupies a 8ft. by 12ft space, can grow 100 tilapia easily, has 60 sq. ft. of growbed space and only consumes 40 watts of power to operate. It requires some plumbing, framework to be made from wood or steel, 8 plastic barrels (200 liter) and of course gravel and fish. Kits for this system could be built here and shipped there with assembly time in a couple days with a crew of people working. I think once one is made the locals will take the construction of others in hand and figure out a way to get things done with materials at hand. I have seen it before and locals can be very creative when they want to be. Let me know your thoughts.

Blessin’s,

Trav.

Charlie Price E-Mail to Matt: 7/22/09;8/01/09/ 8/15/09

July 22, 2009

Dear Matthew

As you can see from below your email reached far and wide. I work at The Institute of Aquaculture at Stirling University and run a not for profit organisation called Aquaponics UK.

Anyway to cut a long story short I too have been inflicted with the Aquaponics bug and am working with a wide range of projects both in the UK and internationally to establish aquaponics systems both for education, rehabilitation and food production. Around a year ago we were actually in talks with some delegates from Afghanistan set up through the British Council who expressed an interest in aquaculture and aquaponics and their suitability due to water scarcity and high potential productivity. (I will chase things up and keep you informed)

In short, I think what your trying to do is fantastic and exactly the kind of initiatives that we need to support. I am extremely keen to help with in any way I can. I have played with various low tech aquaponics systems with a view to their adoption into the developing world as both temporary and semi permanent solutions to food production and enhanced nutrition, but I do agree that pumping is an issue for situations such as yours where services are not readily available and even generators have often untenable.

One method that I would suggest and one that I am exploring with a “scrap-yard engineering wizard” friend of mine is the use of a bicycle to pump sufficient water into a header tank to then operate either flood and drain cycles or through grow beds / nft. This would then mean a predetermined amount of cycling time to provide 12 or 24 hour flow rates (and multiples of two fish tanks on the low and higher levels (I can give you more details if interested)

We’ve recently been given some product development and research and development money from a commercial sponsor “Hydrogarden” and I’m sure this is exactly the kind of project they would be interested in supporting, so if you like, I can get someone to looking into the solar pump situation for you. Plus we’re working with some quite high profile projects in the UK, Eden, CAT, ABLE as well as commercial growers and individual schools and as a result receiving some wide reaching interest from Princess Anne to a recent BBC documentary to be aired shortly. So hopefully we can provide some support in terms of technical expertise but also help to generate publicity for what your trying to do, if required.

It would be good to know more about what sort of aquaponics configuration you had in mind and what species of fish and plants etc. Perhaps when you get time you could give me some more details and we can take it from there..

Best wishes and keep up the good work, if you want any free samples to play about with and experiment over there please let me know and I’ll get them sourced and sent out.

Best wishes

Charlie

Charlie Price - Project Manager
Aquaponics UK
University of Stirling
www.aquaponics.org.uk
Mob: 07545 817206

August 1, 2009

HI there Matthew, sorry for the delay in getting back to you, but I have good news… I think I have a solar system for you…

I have been speaking to German manufacturer of solar panels and pumps, and I have had the provisional offer of help and support from them, with a view to Aquaponics UK developing a standalone system for applications such as yours.

So with your help, I can supply the kit and hopefully together we can trial this system together.

My thoughts were to have a 35w panel, charging a 41A battery pack and then running one or two 17w pumps giving up a pumping head of up to 3m but ideally with a flow rate of 1000–1500ltrs/hr at a head of 0.6–1m. I can supply all of this free of charge, but also tanks if I know what your thinking size wise?

So I hope this email finds your well, Please let me know your thoughts on size then I can put together some other kit (test kits, media, supplementary nutes etc etc) and see below spec for the three solar components.

Kind regards,

Charlie

August 15, 2009

Hi there Matthew

Sorry for not getting back to you sooner I had a huge drama with my laptop (left it on my roof and drove for 130miles before realising!!)

Anyway all is well now….

Right so I have finally manage to get some kit sorted, (see attached document) can you just confirm your address and then best way to send it.

I have also sorted this PV panel system (well asides from the boss signing) and that will follow on shortly after (PV panel, battery pack, and two solar pumps)

I also have to say that obviously aquaponics is much more that the equipment I’m sending and in some sense, feel slightly embarassed about sending “high tech” equipment for an application that can also be resolved with some simple elegant engineering. So please view the donation of this equipment merely to help give you the tools to move things along (and as a show of support). My main priority is to try and help work with you to scale the systems and also to develop low tech solutions that are perhaps more appropriate in the long term, but we need to start somewhere right..?

Great news about the USAID people coming to see you, hope they too realise the potential that some relatively simple solutions can make to localised high value food production. I have been speaking to the PV panel manufactures in Germany and they are right behind the idea, so if we could get some development money for people to get the systems we could develop some simple standalone systems together and really start to get things out there.

It fits perfectly into the Aquaponics UK ethos where we operate on a not for profit basis, feeding profits generated from supplying equipment back into helping people develop Aquaponically…

Other good news is that the BBC documentary I was interviewed for, is coming to air in a couple of weeks, so that will help generate awareness of aquaponics and show them the greenhouses.

Everything is good this end, lots of interesting projects, we’re designing a 10t/yr tilapia and 600m2 salad system at the moment which is fun, but made even better by the fact the power supply is coming from water wheel generators (in a Mill that dates back to 1010AD and was owned by Macbeth in the 1200’s !!) and also that the project is going to provide employment opportunities for young school leavers, but also function as a visitor/learning center.

Also a 130 strong food coop in London with a disused carpark and some land, and numerous other interesting possibilities (and that’s just since we last spoke)

Anyway, I digress, well if you can have a look through the list and see if what’s proposed is suitable and appropriate, and also let me know about delivery logistics, size restrictions?, etc etc.

I hope this email finds you well.

Any further thoughts on system size and design, and what available bits and bobs and available for tanks/troughs. I added some bases like chelated iron, phosphate, and calcium, as I guessed you’d find these useful once you got things going, also a trident multi meter, a bit techy, but useful.

Plus 200 organic plugs to get you going, but I am sure there is local resources like coir which once washed would be great.

Umm, what else, some pumps, (400–1200ltrs/hr, 4000ltrs/hr and 5800ltrs/hr) all 240v but I guessed adaptable in the right hands, there nothing incredibly special but Italian made and reliable (for the Italians!). I also put in a couple of 60w compressors, air hose and diffusers, again to play with, but I think in smaller systems/biomasses you could get most aeration through pump and water flow. Oh and the other thing was autopots, they are great little things, they basically allow water to be feed into a tray/saucer and filled up to 20mm, then the valve closes (no power needed) and stays closed till the tray/saucer is empty, then it fills again, these linked to a reservoir (with fish or with nutrients). Anyway I think they can b quite handy and so included 5 as I’m sure you can find a good use for them maybe as an addition to a system- feed from sump to pots with tomatoes/peppers etc.

Ok, we’ll speak soon

Best wishes

Charlie

September 8th

Dear Godsil,
A big, warm hello from your friends and colleagues out here in Oakland, CA. We have been watching your great work with SweetWater and Growing Power with excitement and pride from afar, and you and your organizations have given us much inspiration! Planting Justice is in its first year of existence (awaiting to hear back from the IRS on our 501c3 application), but already we are making a big impact in our community. We are training local youth in permaculture design and urban farming, holding free community work parties and educational workshops at our various urban garden sites around Oakland, teaching a gardening/permaculture class at San Quentin state prison where we are installing a 1600 sq. foot veggie garden with a class of 30 inmates giving them job-training skills they can use upon their release, and working to create local jobs for disenfranchised urban residents in these areas.

The main reason for this email is because we are need of some help for an exciting and empowering aquaculture project at a low-income high school in Oakland. In collaboration with the Cesar Chavez Institute and their Step to College program, we are in the very beginning stages of planning a recirculating aquaculture system that will help participating students fund their college tuition. The Step to College program takes 30 students every four years that no other teachers want in their classrooms, and through an empowering peer-mentorship program, helps prepare them for college. In the last round, 29 out of 30 students gained acceptance at four-year universities! Although they do a wonderful job at preparing these students mentally, intellectually, and emotionally for college, the extremely high costs of college remain a huge burden.

This is where the aquaculture project comes in! We hope to include these students in the planning, implementation, and maintenance of a recirculating aquaculture system that will provide fresh vegetables to their schoolmates and produce fresh sustainably produced fish for sale to local restaurants, with the proceeds going to fund their college education. We have a number of talented permaculture designers among our core group, but none of us has experience in setting up or maintaining these systems. We are just now starting to write up some grants to fund this project, and would like to include in our grant request some money to pay someone from Growing Power or Sweet Water as a consultant to help on this project and even come out to Oakland for a multi-day workshop to lead the students in the installation of the system?

We do not really have any idea how much the materials for this system would cost. It does not need to necessarily be “state of the art” or very large, maybe the size of just one of Growing Power’s tanks? Just big enough to generate enough funds for these students. We would like it to be somewhat replicable for other urban residents, and thus we’d like to spend as little as possible on materials (maybe even using some salvaged/recycled materials where appropriate?). Is $20,000 to $30,000 a reasonable sum to apply for in grant money for such a project?

We cannot thank you enough for any help you can give! Thank you Godsil!!!!
In solidarity and in alliance for a just, sustainable world,
Gavin Raders and Planting Justice

ps. feel free to check out our website at www.plantingjustice.org for more information on our work.
all the best!

September 13th

Gavin,

There’s a lot that you can do with very little money. I’m proof of that, as I have several thousand dollars worth of donations heading my way from a couple countries. I’m in Afghanistan, as an active duty Marine. In my spare time, I’ve been planning/pimping for an aquaponics project for the schoolhouse here in Nawa, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. We will be using Hesco (wire material that holds dirt/rocks for our quick fortications) and repurposed tanks for our system. If I’m in a war torn country with relatively little time, then you can definitely get some good work done in Oakland.

For ideas of wire-based tanks, check out:
http://backyardaquaponics.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=2640&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=1200

I also HIGHLY recommend checking Craigslist regularly for recycled materials that are being given away. For example, I was able to get 100′s of feet of varied diameter plumbing and irrigation material from a greenhouse that was closing down. The new owner allowed me an entire afternoon when I let him know that I was developing systems for local elementary schools. I was able to use some to learn and develop, and the rest I gave away to a middle school.

I’ll keep you posted on my system here in Nawa, and I wish you the best of luck in O-town. Keep your spirits up and keep your faith.

Be well and best wishes,
Sgt Holzmann, 1st BN, 5th MAR
Back to top

Comfoods Workers Rock!

The comfood workers rock!

Join comfoods tufts listserv,
Bright lights,
Great and modest beings,
Happy to help!

Sweet Water Agrarian Guild School(AGS)Launched

This will be a mixed model enterprise,

 with for-profit and non-profit pieces,

with public and personal interests in mind…
A 36 year time frame envisioned,
Good place for “vision workers”

 with a sense of irony and humor.

If you would like to work on a committee,
send an e-mail to SweetWaterAGS@milwaukeerenaissance.com.

In the Sweet Water AGS vision, Board Members,
Committee Members, and Project Workers will be paid,
once the fruits of our labor, God willing,
yield harvests,
of currency and product.

Sweet Water AGS Current Projects

  1. Wednesday 5 to 7 gatherings at Sweet Water Organics

  2. Compost, vermicompost, and hoop house or green house construction for micro greens behind Sweet Water and affiliated artists Green Room in cooperation with Victory Garden Initiative

  3. Support for Aquaculture Developments in India(Paths to Empowerment), Denver, and Detroit

  4. Development of Aquaponics Tours for Students and Elders

  5. Support for Sweet Water Winter Farmers Market

  6. Support to Worm Farm Institute’s Road Side Food and Culture Stands in Urban Food Deserts

  7. Support for Marriage of Artists, Artisans, Engineers, Mechanics with Swet Water Agrarians

  8. Sparking a Hoop House at Each and Every Fire House Project

Sweet Water News for Clients, Partners, and Investors

Sweet Water Soap Box Orator Try Outs

Soap Box Moments at Sweet Water Every Wednesday 5 to 5:15 p.m.

The Saint Patrick Brigid Day Soap Box Moments at Timbuktu

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/StPatsAtTimbuktu/HomePage

These past 7 years has inspired Sweet Water to offer the same
On a trial weekly basis, every Wednesday evening from 5 to 5:15.

Soap Box Orators Given 2 Minute Moments

We hope to find student interns to make youtube videos
Of the top Sweet Water Soap Box Orators

If you wish to sign up, send an e-mail to
godsil.james@gmail.com.

Volunteering at Sweet Water

Would you be up for some on-line or in-person conversations about developing…

  • a volunteer program
  • a student intern program
  • event nights, e.g. weddings, family re-unions, company celebrations, etc.
  • art gallery nights
  • the world’s first CSA fish farm
  • the winter farmers’ market
  • fish/plant/worm/compost sales experiments
  • general information/communication work
  • projects you and yours conceive
  • and more!

Or, would you rather focus on Sweet Water Hands-on tasks, like…

  • watering the worms and compost pile
  • layering compost, spreading wood chips, moving things
  • planting plants, micro-greens, horticulture stuff
  • gathering objects Sweet Water needs, e.g. chairs
  • various things that make Sweet Water beautiful, efficient, and pure,

e.g. fixing 5 broken hoses, clean-up and grounds policing

If you keep track of your hours in a systematic way to help us
develop an information base to help replicate Sweet Waters,
I would be honored to eventually offer you one fish I
for each hour so volunteered, as well as worms and
compost. Or, I would offer you my peddler’s prowess
for your personal and/or public projects. Your volunteer work
could also translate into a place on the Board or Committees
of the Sweet Water Guild Schools, which anticipate paying
Board and committee members once, God willing, the revenues
arrive.

Bring Your Students and Elders to Milwaukee For Sweet Water Tour!

We will help you find accomodations and other places to visit!

Sweet Water Student Tours, $80 Minimum, Up to 40 Students

Most Fall and Winter dates are open!

We could handle as many as 40 students at the rate of $2 per student,
But must have a minimum of $80 hour to 90 minutes tour,
which could include some hands on experience.

Please know that all of our knowledge base is provisional.
We are growing information as well are aspiring to grow fish and vegetables.

We have access to many brilliant and passionate urban agrarians
Who might wish to help us offer your students some very good learning moments!

We would prefer to have some on-line brainstorming to make the tour the very best,
With your students, faculty, administration, and school family community!

Grateful,

Godsil

P.S. We would help you fund raise your students fees. The students could help too!

Become a Sweet Water Fish Monger

I am astonished and deeply grateful every day I walk into that vast old and lovely building,constructed along passive solar lines, and witness life—the sweet tilapia,
strong perch, the basil and lady bugs, proliferating snails and worms, billions of beneficial bacteria I’ll never get to see…supported by
machines—whirring fans, heating and air giving machines, electric lights, the mighty bobcat!

Pray for Sweet Water, which, if it works as intended, could make quite a difference
for groping and struggling humanity. People from the world entiere are connecting with us, hoping for replications: a marine in Afghanistan, an American Budhist in India, an Asian Indian queenly woman from London, folks from Detroit, Denver, partout!

The Sweet Water drama has interestingly found me tongue tied, at least as far as my folk poetry goes. Here are the only tries I’ve found in this summer’s black brain I clutch throughout the day: (I hope they might inspire you to buy or sell some of our fish!)

The Compost Pile of Sweet Water

Grow the compost piles:
Wood chips, leaves,
Fruit, vegetables.

Manage the water,
Top off with carbon only,
Witness redemption cycles.

Rinse the 50- gallon “Brutes,”
Immediately, or bugs!
Water for the growing heap.

Cell phone brainstorm with the Younges,
Tidy things up a bit.
Alterra run for eggshell power.

Mind In Eco System

The baby tilapia fly above the waters,
Hungry.

The worms entwine inside the softening bananas,
Hungry, ready to mate!

The basil and mint reach up from fish nourished soil,
Hungry.

Lady bugs hang around the big blue sand filter,
Hungry, ready to mate!

The lights radiate, the fans whir,
The pumps filter, the heater warms.

Trucks deliver radiant carbon and nitrogen harvests,
Machines and humans most often obliging.

And we watch, examine, tinker, explore,
Experiment, learn, fail, re-try…learn.

Hungry.
Grateful.

Sweet Water Fall Compost Sale for Spring Crop

Buy your honey some radiant Sweet Water soil for Valentine’s Day!

Sweet Water compost has been growing since April 2009,
Consisting of thousands of pounds of Roast and Sven’s coffee grounds,
Great Lakes Distillery “Spent Grain” or “Brewer’s Mash,”
Sendek’s fruit and veggie waste, Alterra egg shells,
The Bay View Pick and Save…

Radiant nitrogen harvest!

Mixed with…

Radiant carbon harvest!

Mostly from Asplundh tree trimmers,
Bay View’s Francis Griffen, and Hawks Nursery…

$1 per 5 gallon pail’s worth
Call 414 232 1336 or e-mail godsil.james@gmail.com

Become a $5 Sweet Water Investor

Our investors will receive $5 worth of perch or tilapia(2010),
a tour ticket, 5 gallons of Sweet Water radiant compost, and/or 15 minutes of consulting time, at this moment. Other offerings in future announcements.

Suggested Reading for Sweet Water Partners and Investors

We are offering Sweet Water agent status to good food movement workers,
Work opportunities paid not in cash but in Sweet Water products,
Including perch, tilapia, micro-greens, wheat grass, worms, compost,
winter farmers’ market space, training, tours, events, workshops, and
installations.

Such agents would best profit from their Sweet Water transactions
By following information offered at this site:

http://www.milwaukeerenaissance.com/SweetWaterFishFarming/HomePage

Grateful,

Sweet Water Olde

A Four Season Hoop House for Each and Every Fire House!

Our fire fighters are poised to help us grow local!

In each firehouse are one or two valiant firefighters
Who are also avid food gardeners.

All they need is help constructing hoop houses at the firehouses,
Some compost and worm castings, and…
“Oh my God, did you taste the spinach from the neighborhood fire house garden?”

I hope for some help with this so it is realized
Well before my 100th birthday party.

What say?

Why not?

Fall In the Air

Ripe Red Cherry Tomatoes for Valiant Fire Fighters

What if a widening circle of grateful citizens
Began showing up at Fire Houses on September mornings
With baskets of fresh garden picked tomatoes?

What a pleasant surprise for our valiant fire fighters!

And Firefighters Teach Our Children

And they teach our children,
Now about fires,
Next, about light, air, water,
Soil, seeds, and…

Lovely food!

Why not each firehouse
In each city
Equipped with a…

Hoop house!

David Swanson’s Braise Culinary School First Sweet Water Basil Customer

I am proud and happy to announce Sweet Water’s First customer,
Bay View’s David Swanson of the Braise Culinary School, who will be
Collecting today some of the basil crop our 5,000 perch have helped nourish!

Here is a nice Bay View “Compasss” story about David’s great work:

http://bayviewcompass.com/archives/164

Restaurant supported agriculture

August 29, 2008

Bay View resident David Swanson’s Braise Culinary School received $25,502 from a state grant to launch the first business of its kind in the country.

The Braise RSA, short for Restaurant Supported Agriculture, will unite farmers’ local ingredients with local restaurants.

“Being a chef with over 20 years’ experience in dealing with local food, I know the challenges it can present,” said Swanson. “The Braise RSA minimizes the challenges for restaurants while allowing farmers to be fairly compensated for their hard work.”

In its model year, the RSA is connecting eight farmers to three restaurants.

Braise was one of seven recipients of new $225,000 “Buy Local, Buy Wisconsin” state grant money doled out in July.

The RSA is building a small storage facility at Pinehold Gardens in Oak Creek, which will house the fresh vegetables for immediate delivery to the restaurants, Swanson said.

“Even though there are hundreds of farms surrounding the metro Milwaukee area, chefs and restaurateurs don’t have the time or resources to access the local, seasonal produce,” said Swanson. “It’s much easier for chefs to call a national food distributor for produce imported from California or elsewhere. The Braise model will make local, peak-of-season produce easily accessible.”

Building on the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) system already in place for participating farmers, Swanson has partnered with David Kozlowski, who serves as the liaison between the farmers and restaurants. Kozlowski, a grower and owner of Pinehold Gardens, worked with Swanson to design the RSA model.

Participating area restaurants include Meritage and La Merenda of Milwaukee and Café Manna of Brookfield.

“Now it’s much easier to offer our customers dishes based on local, seasonal ingredients,” said Peter Sandroni, chef/owner La Merenda.

Braise Culinary School’s mission is to source food locally and to heighten consumers’ awareness of their foods’ origin. Founded in 2006, it includes Braise on the Go traveling culinary school where cooking classes are held in farm fields or orchards.
Swanson is a James Beard recognized chef whose restaurant experience includes Sanford in Milwaukee, Le Français and Carlo’s in the Chicago area, and Commander’s Palace in New Orleans.


Here are some pictures of Sweet Water’s evolution from Growing Power training in Dec. 2008 through to April 2009.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ourrenaissance/sets/72157622045002814/

---

Please call 414 232 1336 if you would like to stop over at Sweet Water to meet with Andy Maier and probably Dr. Dave and Jan Christensen from 5 to 7 p.m.

Fish Farm Archives

Off-Line NotesAttach:file.ext

Last edited by Godsil. Based on work by Tyler Schuster, Commonwealth Citizen, Vanessa Jones and TeganDowling.  Page last modified on July 26, 2010

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